Daily Archives: January 21, 2012

A Great Viking Feast -Leifsburdir

Most likely the only place in North America where one can eat in a sod hut and enjoy a Great Viking Feast is on Fishing Point, St. Anthony, NL.

Last September 2011, I attended the final feast of the season which was a fundraiser for the local Boys & Girls Club. An incredible meal of meat, potatoes and other root crops. One will quickly notice there are no forks – simply because the Vikings did not use forks. It can be quite challenging trying to eat certain foods without this utensil. Although, one never really thinks about it until he or she does not have it. Funny how we take for granted some of the items we use daily that makes life a little easier.

As that evening progressed we were treated to theatrical performances, music, ballads and even served by people dressed up in Viking attire.

My friend from Switzerland certainly enjoy the walkabout the Leifsburdir and the view of St. Anthony in the backdrop.

The crashing waves and rocky shores are something to see as you walk to the entrance for service. If you can in 2012, you may want to dine and experience a Great Viking Feast on Fishing Point.

Experience the Great Northern Peninsula -

Christopher C. Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

Frozen Waterfall – Fishing Point, St. Anthony, NL

The road to Fishing Point in St. Anthony, NL is a winding narrow road like that of Signal Hill, which receives great attention from locals and visitors no matter what time of year one visits.

At the end of the road there are pull-offs, board walks, walking trails and even a hike to the top of the hill for the more avid adventurer. The views are terrific – as you can peer out at the open ocean and sense the freedom and life it creates. The smell of the salt water, the sights of St. Anthony Bight, rugged rocks and if lucky a giant iceberg.

One never knows what will capture their eye. I placed the picture above to illustrate this, as I am looking at something completely different from my German buddy. I have been to Fishing Points on many occasions, but I am never disappointed even if I walk the same steps. This visit gave me a  frozen waterfall.

A tour of St. Anthony is not complete unless it is coupled with some time to capture the landscape and natural wonder that Fishing Point so freely offers. Get out and find your frozen waterfall today!

Live Rural NL -
Christopher C. Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North 

Great Northern Peninsula’s Only Traffic Light

I had mentioned in my last post, “Trekking Teahouse Hill in Winter” that St. Anthony is home to the only traffic light on the Great Northern Peninsula.

On that visit we did get the Red Light – certainly my luck. :)

If on your travels, you make it to this waterfront town, nestled near the Tip of the Great Northern Peninsula you too can say I’ve been stopped at the only traffic light they have up that way!

Cheers from Rural NL -

Christopher C. Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

A Trek up Teahouse Hill in Winter

On January 4th, 2012 – My friends and I spent some time in St. Anthony – where you will find the only traffic light on the Great Northern Peninsula. However, St. Anthony`s claim to fame is much bigger than a traffic light – it was the home of Dr. Wilfred Thomason Grenfell.

I am  currently reading, A Biography of Dr. Wilfred Grenfell – a Doctor, Missionary and Politician who radically changed the way of living for the people of Northern Newfoundland & Labrador as an International Association was founded to help enhance the social, medical and economic climate of the region.

Grenfell House (pictured in the background above) is one of the Historic Properties which thousands of visitors walk through beginning in May and into the Fall to gain insight on what it was like to live a day in the life of the good Doctor. I have been there many times; however, this was my first visit to Teahouse Hill. I remember my grandmother talking about her walking up to see the simple markers of Dr. Grenfell and the site of where his ashes were buried. Yet, never had I taken the time to experience for myself what it meant to trek teahouse hill – a common play area for the children of St. Anthony.

Teahouse Hill overlooks the town of St. Anthony. According to the Grenfell site, the walking trail is approximately 20 minutes and has been developed to National standards. Although, it seemed much longer on this chilly day of January. We were not really sure where we were going and really hoped not to get lost as the signs or interpretative panels were taken down for the season.

Oh no! – a fallen tree….

Headlines to read…`Mitchelmore uses brute strength to restore the tree to the vertical position`

Unfortunately, Mitchelmore is no Chuck Norris and the leaning tree remains.

The trail is a wonderful winter walk. I can only imagine the joys of walking or jogging along the trails in Spring or midsummer after a day in the office. A great offering for residents and visitors alike.

At the top of the hill there are three strategically placed lookouts that permit you to see the Town, the harbour and gain views of the ocean. The freedom of seeing the open water is quite powerful.

There is beauty in this space. It seems like the wonderful place to re-build a seasonal teahouse – offering incredible views and a place for people to escape and enjoy the beauty of nature that surrounds them, as well as a site for geocaching.

I recommend taking a trek to teahouse hill. This may have been my first visit, I sure hope it is not my last.

Live Rural NL -

Christopher C. Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North
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