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Marketing Outport Newfoundland & Labrador

Newfoundland & Labrador has marketed ‘outport’ or rural parts of the province in its award-winning tourism ad campaigns.

Innovative rural companies like Auk Island Winery in Twillingate are continuing to add flavour to the tourism experience. Newfoundland & Labrador takes pride in its unique local berries, such as patridgeberry, bakeapples, squashberries, as well as our very own Screech Rum. This company typically makes berry wines and sells quintessentially on Newfoundlandia.

I have tried bottles that are called, “Moose Juice”, “Krooked Cod”, “Jellybean Row” and “Funky Puffin”. I believe part of my purchasing of this product is curiosity, but primarily to support a local business that prides itself in all things Newfoundland & Labrador.

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The imagery on Outport Wine, which includes an iceberg, outport boats and fishing rooms. The splash of Screech just adds to the authenticity and certainly begins the storytelling process.

This season I hope to tour Auk Island Winery and taste many other wines they have produced in various shapes and sizes. Let’s keep being creative and expand the rural economy and our visitor experiences as we celebrate traditional and modern-day outports.

Live Rural NL -

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

Apple, Walnut and Blue Cheese Salad with Lingonberry Vinaigrette

The Lingonberry in Rural Newfoundland & Labrador is referred to locally as the “Partridgeberry”.

After reviewing From Our Atlantic Woods -Non-Timber Forest Product Directory 2009-2010, a recipe supplied by Pure Labrador seemed like a delicious use of for local berries.

Apple, Walnut and Blue Cheese Salad with Lingonberry Vinaigrette (Serves 4)

Ingredients (Vinaigrette)

Directions -

Mix all together and shake well

Ingredients (Salad)

  • Mixed baby salad greens
  • 1 apple
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) crumbled blue cheese

Directions -

  1. Spread a bed of salad greens on 4 plates
  2. Core and quarter the apple
  3. Thinly slice each quarter into 6-8 slices and place on the greens in an attractive fan
  4. Sprinkle 1 tbsp (15 ml) each walnuts and blue cheese over the apple and greens
  5. Drizzle the Lingonberry Vinaigrette over the salads.

 I am looking forward to trying this salad, which will have local wild berries. Be creative with locally grown products and start your own FOOD REVOLUTION!

Squashberry Jam from Grandmother Pearl

My youthful Grandmother Pearl at 66 years of age is a wonder in the kitchen. She tends to prepare large meals for her extended family on a regular basis. On Sunday, one can suspect that she has a massive pot of salt beef, vegetables, meat and bread pudding cooking for a Sunday dinner.

She ensures to hold onto local tradition of ensuring recipes of wild game, fish and beans are mainstays at her table. There is nothing like a piece of fresh halibut out of her pan during the months of summer.

Her specialty skills come as a baker. She makes all sorts of squares, buns, rolls, cakes and my most loved item – her freshly baked pies with apples or local Newfoundland berries. There is nothing like a cut of bakeapple or partridge-berry pie and a scoop of ice-cream.

Spreading Squashberry Jam on Toast

Last time I was at her house, she gave me a small sample of her squashberry jam. I can not re-call if I have ever tasted such a local treat. I was eager to place this jam on a piece of toast. It is quite delicious. I look forward to berry picking this summer.

If you would like more information or to purchase some Squashberry product, you can visit locally The Dark Tickle Company in beautiful St. Lunaire-Griquet, Great Northern Peninsula at http://www.darktickle.com/squashberryinfo.aspx

Live Rural NL 0

Christopher Mitchelmore

Patridgeberry Pie Recipe

It is that time of year to enjoy a freshly made patridgeberry pie.

  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 cup margarine
  • 1/3 cup milk
  • 1 tsp. vinegar, added to milk
  • 1 1/2- 2 cups patridgeberry berries
  • sugar and butter

Pastry:

Mix flour and margarine with pastry blender until it resembles crumbs, add the milk mixture, a little at a time, stirring with a fork or knife.

Roll out on slightly floured board and cut to fit pie plate. Put in amount of berries required and sprinkle with sugar to taste. Add a few pieces of margarine. Cover wwith strips or full-size layer of pastry. Bake at hot oven. Makes 2 small double pies or one large one.

Partridge Berry Picking….A Family Affair

Lingonberry or Patridgeberry

It is that time of year again, when a lot of rural Newfoundlanders and Labradorians gear up with jugs, buckets and other containers to the barren fields in search of the red ruby berries, known to us as the “partridge-berry” and internationally as the “Lingonberry”.

The following information has been taken directly from the Dark Tickle Company’s, St. Lunaire-Griquet, NL website. Partridge berry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea). Internationally known as the lingonberry this relative of the cranberry family is a low mat forming evergreen shrub with tiny rounded leaves. These berries grow in the dry, acidic soils of Newfoundland and Labrador’s barrens and coastal headlands. Their twin flowers have a pinkish hue in bud then turn white as they bloom in mid-June to mid-July. The fusing of the two flower ovaries gives rise to a single dark red berry ripening through September’s frost. Tart in flavour they are high in vitamin C, tannin, anthocyanin, and antioxidants. These agents are attributed to the prevention of high blood pressure, urinary tract infections, cardiovascular disease, cataracts, slowing such aging processes as memory loss and the deterioration of motor skill, improving circulation, as well as the prevention of certain forms of cancer.

Well, we have experienced the first September’s frost this past Saturday on the Northern Peninsula making it the opportune time to get your berries. I remember picking with my family near the barrens near the St. Anthony airport. There would be patches of red, where you could pick to your heart’s delight. I’m not the biggest fan of this berry, it is a little tart for my taste. I prefer the bakeapple (cloudberry), however this was a fun activity for the whole family to participate and enjoy.

Partridge berry’s are loved by many people. The berries find themselves in many jams, jellies, fillings of pies, side dishes or garnishes. However, there is an opportunity to diversify these agri-food products and add greater value. The Dark Tickle Company has done an exceptional job of creating chocolates and teas using these berry products.

Rodriguez Winery in the province produces many speciality wines and liqueurs from fruit and berry products. Check them out at: http://www.rodrigueswinery.com.

While visiting the Norsemen Restaurant & Gaia Art Gallery, L’Anse Aux Meadows (http://www.valhalla-lodge.com/restaurant.htm) I had the opportunity to sample a drink called the “Partridgrini”. I don’t know the recipe, but did find one from “Occasions Magazine”, which is distributed by the Newfoundland & Labrador Liquor Corporation.

PARTRIDGE & APPLE MARTINI

  • 1/2 ounce of partridge berries
  • 1 oz Pulukka lingonberry Lapponia
  • 1 oz Phillips Butterscotch Ripple Schnapps
  • 3 oz apple juice
  • Apple wedges

Preparation:

  1. Drop the partridge berries in the bottom of the martini glass
  2. Shake apple juice, schnapps and lingonberry lapponia with ice and strain over berries using cocktail shaker
  3. Garnish with partridge berries and apple wedges

Opportunities exist to diversify as consumer tastes broadened in rural communities to appeal to both locals and tourists. We are not limited to local markets, as exporting is readily available. Don’t get me wrong, there will always be a special place in our hearts for Grandma’s Partridge berry pie or Mom’s jam. However, we can be creative and find additional uses for this renewable natural resource that grows in abundance on the Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland & Labrador.

Enjoy your experience with the Partidge-tini!

Live Rural NL – CCM

Brigus Blueberry Festival

Beautiful Brigus

Newfoundland & Labrador is well-known for a summer of events, activities and festivals.

The Brigus Blueberry Festival is Award Winning and in its 23rd year! I dropped by this summer along with the other 17,000 plus visitors during August 12-15, 2010. It was my first time in historic Brigus on this lovely Sunday afternoon. The event coordinators expected a large crowd and had made the main streets one way to help with the flow of traffic. It took a little while to get a packing space, as it seemed everyone was arriving at the same time.  After safely parking in a large field, I was not disappointed as I walked through the streets of this quaint town that boasts beautiful vernacular heritage architecture. There were large crowds and great photo opportunities.

The festival activities include: A Royal Shag Up” – comedy dinner theatre, Steps Through Time - walking tour, Newfie night with Screech Ins, community breakfasts, dinners, and suppers, a two-day Folk Festival with well-known Newfoundland talent, visits by Miss Teen Newfoundland and Labrador and Miss Newfoundland and Labrador, the Missed Blueberry Pageant, raffles, craft stalls, baked goods, a pie eating contest, games of chance, mooseburgers, cash bar, children’s games, dances, and fireworks at the Brigus Waterfront. (http://www.brigus.net/blue.htm)

The waterfront

We stopped to have a mooseburger and beer, which went down very nicely! It was followed by a good drop of moose soup. It was good, but not comparable to my grandmothers…she makes the world’s best! There was a large queue to enter. The toll was $2.00 for the complete weekend pass. A number of booths and stands were set-up with local artisans, organizations and entrepreneurs selling their wares. We made our way pass the many games of chance and listened to some traditional Newfoundland music.

We decided to drive through Cupids, celebrating 400 years as the oldest Town in English North America! As well as visit Carbonear and Harbour Grace. The SS Kyle still remains aground as you enter this town.

It was a wonderful day, filled with lots of fun, food, sounds and sights! I recommend you to put the Brigus Blueberry Festival on your list of things to do. So make sure you mark your calendars for the 24th annual in August 2011!

Live Rural NL – CCM

Bakeapple Jam, Vinegar and Tea

Freshly made "Bakeapple" jam at Dark Tickle

If you grew up in Rural NL part of the experience is tasting many of the locally grown berries, such as the partridgeberry (lingonberry), squashberry, gooseberry, and most of all for me the beloved bakeapple (cloudberry). I have fond memories of picking these berries on the marshes and barrens not too far from my home. I would have a small jug as a boy and my parents larger ones. My father would always have three or four times the amount I would pick. I look forward to when the bakeapples ripen again, sometime later this month to early August so I can start picking. The reward is fresh jam, pies, squares and toppings for icecream and cheesecake.

Yesterday, I had supper (supper is the evening meal) with my grandmother. We talked about bakeapples as she poured a heaping amount of freshly made fluffy “doughboys” (or dumplings), which we were about to eat with garden vegetables and salt meat. I love eating with my grandmother, she makes the best traditional foods, it may be her years of experience and knowledge not to follow every direction and still have it turned out as sweet and flavourful as the person she is today. A meal spurs lots of conversations as we discussed staples of yesteryear, gathering and harvesting from the land and how one learns to make bread, doughboys, jams and the like.

While on vacation on June 28, 2010 I decided to stop at The Dark Tickle Company, in very scenic St. Lunaire-Griquet and enroute to L’Anse au Meadows, National Historic and World UNESCO Heritage site. This is an economusuem. 

 

Producing Jam Behind Glass

An ECONOMUSEUM

® is a craft or agri-foods business whose products are the fruit of an authentic technique or know-how. The business showcases artisans and craft trades by offering an area for interpreting its production and by opening its doors to the public.   

ECONOMUSEUM®, which are self-financed through the sale of their products, make an innovative contribution to the cultural tourism sector. (Source: http://www.economusees.com/iens_en.cfm)

The owners, Steve and Gwen Knudsen have done a remarkable job of establishing a true working economuseum. As you enter the facility you can view a worker preparing product behind the glass, they also have a tasting station, various interpretative panels, inviting NL music and their Granchain Exhibit, which is the winner of the Manning Award, as well as a large gift shop with a variety of their products and other artists. These entrepreneurs have taken making preserves to a new level as they have greatly expanded and developed their products to include non-traditional items residents would not typically make from berries, these include teas, vinegars, sauces, syrups and chocolates. You can visit an incredible website to see for yourself and even order their products on-line. Check out: http://www.darktickle.com/. I was quite pleased with the cup of bakeapple tea and the blueberry infused NL Screech chocolates I purchased.

Tradition can be retained, but it can also evolve with the right mindset. Steve, Gwen and their family are part of that process. My hat goes off to people like these, that take simple ideas and turn them into something so wonderfully pleasant to enjoy. Their power of ingenuity and innovation has truly made me proud to say this business exists in Rural NL.

We need more people like Steve and Gwen, that will take a simple concept and create an experience. We have a rich culture and heritage that is unique and should be shared with others in today’s global world.

Live Rural NL…

We Will Grow and Prosper.

CCM -

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