Blog Archives

A Feed of Moose Meat in the Woods

A little salt and a shake of pepper at the flavour to savour as I cook the moose patties and thin moose steaks. The result – A double moose cheese burger, steak and well we had some hash browns as a side. This is not a menu item you will find at McDonalds or other fast food chains in Newfoundland & Labrador. If you are lucky you may find a restaurant or two that actually sells moose on the menu. This is surely not for lack of demand. Moose Burgers are a hot item at Jackladder Gas Station outside Deer Lake on Route 430 or the MayFlower Inn & Adventures, Roddickton, NL.

Since we had an extra burger we opted to share between the three, creating the 1/3 burger not the 1/3 pounder or 1/4 pounder but the 1/3 burger. Maybe these will catch on with a toothpick as a party appetizer?

The Great Northern Peninsula would not be the place it is today without a feed of moose. We have to be careful, and may need to reduce licences in the Straits-White Bay North as moose are getting scarce. Even in the Moose Capital of the World – Roddickton, there are fewer and fewer moose.

If you get the opportunity when visiting, try a moose burger! Why are moose not being ranched to produce moose meat for retail at supermarkets and restaurants on a larger scale, without impacting the annual hunt?

Live Rural NL -

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

Moose Antlers Make Quite the Entrance – Englee, NL

On a recent trip to Englee, NL my attention was drawn to the house below that had a very beautifully landscaped yard, fountain with Moose Antlers combined to make quite the entrance.

I am proud to see this unique creation by a local artist. It is great to see creative uses for a product that most people would just throw away. Moose are in abundance on the Great Northern Peninsula. Males shed their antlers each season to conserve energy, as well their antlers can be obtained during Moose Hunting season in Fall/early Winter.

There is value in producing unique products. I have seen antlers used to form a large chandelier at the Tuckamore Lodge, Main Brook. There are also a select few with the talents to tediously carve from the moose antler.

This past weekend, my two friends showed me a unique product made from a wooden tree with deer antlers - a Coat Tree.

We have an opportunity to produce unique products made from moose antlers. We can develop a cottage industry around them and make high-end coat trees, chandeliers, entrance posts, and others. We have talented people in our rural economies that could produce during the Fall/Winter these products from sale on-line or at local gift shops.

There are simple solutions that can help our rural communities survive and thrive. With the appropriate partnerships and involvement by stakeholders we can change the state of our economy.

Live Rural NL -

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

Twitter/LiveRuralNL

Moose on Great Northern Peninsula Abides Traffic Laws

On a recent drive up the Great Northern Peninsula, past Gros Morne National Park en route to my hometown  as a passenger I was able to snap a moose abiding by the traffic laws.

In the first image the moose does not realize he should turn and is thinking of making a dash across the highway.

Something clicks and he catches the sign and realizes he most likely should turn.

He opts to return to the forest.

The Great Northern Peninsula has an abundance of moose, most likely there are more moose than people. During the prelude to the  beginning of the tourism season, I have seen more moose on or near the road than vehicles when driving the highway.

If you are interested in seeing wildlife, such as moose or caribou, the Great Northern Peninsula is a gem. Especially, Roddickton  (Moose Capital of the World) or drive from Eddies Cove East to St. Anthony. However, be cautious as not all moose use the same judgement as this one; they have been known to reek havoc on our highways. Each year signs are posted noting the number of reported moose vehicle collisions on Route 430. This number was nearing double-digits the last time I passed the sign.

The Viking Trail, Route 430 on the Great Northern Peninsula is your premier destination if you want a serene scenic drive with a high likelihood of catching a glimpse of a moose, caribou or even an iceberg!

Experience the Road to the Vikings this summer on the Great Northern Pen!

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

Related Article:

Got to Get Me Moose by’

A Seal Flipper Foodstand?

Why are we not serving up Seal Flippers throughout the summer season?

Moose Burgers, Moose Stew and Caribou Steak have made the menus of some local restaurants and have made appearances at various festivals and special events throughout the summer. They sell like hot cakes. But seal meat does not make the cut? I have been hearing that seal flippers have been for sale recently at the waterfront at St. Johns, NL in a large supply over the local radio network. However, that is not Rural NL.

Crepe Stand, Paris, France

After travelling to many countries, there always seems to be a mobile food service stand that sells something significant to the culture. In Paris there are crepes made at street vendors. They are incredibly delicious. In Switzerland and the Czech Republic at Christmas, roasted nuts appeared to be a staple. New York has their famous hot dogs and Belgium – waffles, of course.

 
There may be room for an outlet that sells seal, wild game and other traditional cuisine of Rural Newfoundland & Labrador for those on the run.
 
Live Rural NL -
Christopher C. Mitchelmore
 
 

 

Plane Touching Down in Deer Lake

Derek Pilgrim’s song, “When the Plane Touches Down in Deer Lake” resonates with many rural Newfoundlanders & Labradorians. The plane landing on the rock, brings a feeling of being home even though I live more than 330 kms to the north.

On May 2, 2011 I departed Deer Lake Regional Airport for Halifax. There a connection to Boston and from there to reach Las Vegas, Nevada. I certainly enjoyed a week away in the desert climate with an abundance of nightly entertainment. It was nice to re-unite with an old friend and to meet others for the first time.

After a week away, a feeling of happiness came upon me when the plane touched down in Deer Lake. The professional staff of Air Canada and the airport staff made the travel a breeze. I landed at 2:46 AM and left the parking lot at 3:20 AM to drive the distance, as I would work in the AM.

Driving up the Great Northern Peninsula, the vehicle count was 10 – moose count was 11. The moose are out in abundance and in great numbers. Be safe when travelling beautiful Route 430 – The Viking Trail. It can be a haven for wildlife.

Moose opting to turn vs. cross the road to on-coming traffic

My grandmother & I saw four lovely caribou grazing on a yard in the community of Bear Cove as we were en route to a traditional Sunday’s Dinner. I wish I had my camera handy. Visit the Great Northern Peninsula and get that wonderful feeling of the plane landing at Deer Lake for yourself this summer season.

 
Live Rural NL -
Christopher C. Mitchelmore

Moose Hunting at Gros Morne & Terra Nova National Park

                                                                                                                          

Moose Antlers in Gros Morne

The Rick Mercer Report  brought National attention to the moose population by tacking a helicopter to track and tag moose at Gros Morne National Park. He coined Gros Morne, as home to the more moose per square kilometer than almost anywhere on Earth.  Newfoundland & Labrador has a growing moose population, which CBC.ca has reported there are more than 150,000 moose in the province, with about 5,000 in Gros Morne National Park alone. This is a large number considering the human population of the island portion of the province is about 480,000 people.

 
 
I support the issue of approximately 500 moose licences in these National Parks. This is a good start, considering the damage and impact they are having on other species, habitats and on human life. Just two weeks ago, when driving through Gros Morne National Park the sign states, so far this year “7 Vehicle Collisions involving Moose”. I have seen this sign reach the mid-thirties as the summer continues. CBC reported in a link below, that one woman had hit three moose in May.
 
The management of the moose population is becoming a growing problem in Newfoundland & Labrador. The Provincial Government is taking some action, as they are grooming greater parts of the highway and issuing 5,000 additional licences, after continued pressure from SOPAC (Save Our People Action Committee) and a class-action lawsuit against the Crown from victims of moose-vehicle collisions. The Federal Government has finally taken action regarding the growing problems at Gros Morne National Park.
 
The Federal Government should work with local outfitters that have the planes and resources to provide them with additional licences. The economic impact on the local economy can be great.
 
Live Rural NL 0
Christopher Mitchelmore
 
 
 

NL Moose Soup on Saturday

Saturday in Rural Newfoundland, has long been known as Soup Saturday. In September 2009, I returned to my community on the island of Newfoundland. Since that time, I continue my previous tradition of visiting my grandmother who makes soup every Saturday to enjoy a drop.

Moose Soup from Grandma's Kitchen

She makes traditional split pea soup, turkey neck, rabbit, partridge and my favourite – Moose Soup.

I love the flavour of the all the garden vegetables mixed with salt meat (beef) and of course the moose. I also love the fact that she adds macaroni noodles. Those who know me well, know I enjoy macaroni in my soup. In fact, my Aunt Viola always added extra to her soup when she knew I was coming over.

Moose Meat from the Soup

When I enter my grandmother’s kitchen on Saturday, she had the moose meat placed on the table, salt & pepper shakers are always in the same location, homemade bread is sliced and strawberry flavoured drink mix readily available.  One has to dig in and can not simply stop at one bowl.

Freshly Sliced Homemade Bread

Soup is a great dinnertime meal (we do not call it lunch in Rural Newfoundland), especially when it is complimented by some of grandma’s freshly baked bread.

 
Over the cooling of the soup, we usually share memories of the past, talk about my grandfather, family and days from my grandmother’s childhood.
 
Tetley Tea & Biscuits

We continue the conversation over a cup of Tetley Tea after our meal and marshmallow biscuits that I’ve enjoyed at grandma’s ever since I can remember.

 
I just called asking for the recipe, which all spoken like a true Newfoundland cook, not with exact measurements.
 
She uses moose meat, with some bone (if possible), a handful of salt beef in a 4 qrt. pot adding water and letting simmer for a couple of hours. She dices carrot, turnip and potatoes (about 3 or 4 handfuls) and adds to the pot for about 45 minutes. A chopped onion is added. She adds 1/4 cup of rice and macaroni for about 20 minutes. She adds a can of tomato soup and beef oxo cup for additional flavour. Grandma’s secret recipe is out! I’ll still prefer her pot to mine any day.
 
This is one tradition, I am happy to continue as I live in Rural Newfoundland and will cherish always.
 
Live Rural NL 0
Christopher Mitchelmore

Got to Get Me Moose by’

Moose

September 11, 2010  marks the start of moose hunting season for most areas across the province of Newfoundland & Labrador. It is a time of year that is highly anticipated by many local residents and visitors from out of province to partake in such an important traditional and cultural activity. 

“The traditions and culture associated with hunting and trapping are quite significant in our province, and I encourage everyone to take advantage of the many wonderful opportunities that exist,” said Minister Johnson. “As a public resource, wildlife must be managed so that it benefits the diverse interests of all stakeholders, while ensuring that populations of animals and their habitats can be sustained for future generations” (Click for more info on the 2010-11 Hunting and Trapping Guide and Big Game Licence Applications). 

Hunting presents an economic boom for outfitting lodges and many small local businesses for supplies, transportation needs, accommodations and meat processors. We must use extreme caution on our highways and watch out for our brightly orange dressed companions in the wilderness as we spend time with our buddies in search of delicious moose meat. At the bottom, I’ve included a Moose Stew Recipe. 

The activity has been popularized through song written and performed by Kevin Blackmore and Ray Johnson of Buddy Wasisname and the Other Fellers. Lyrics below: 

 

Like to go a-moose hunting, hunting in the fall,
Like to go a-moose hunting, answer the hunting call:
“Gotta get me moose, b’y!”
 

Well first to get a moose licence you apply for six whole years,
At thirty-five dollars a crack, old man, with a partner for half shares;
And when you get the licence, “cock” ’tis area twenty-eight,
Nowhere near civ-il-i-zation, three hundred miles away.
But I gotta get me moose, b’y!! 

Like to go a-moose hunting, hunting in the fall,
Like to go a-moose hunting, answer the hunting call:
“Gotta get me moose, b’y!”
 

To get ya where you’re going it’s a Hilton on four wheels,
Gets easily stuck, and the gas tank leaks and something up front squeals;
We met four fellas on a trip and we got on the beer,
They were on their way to our back yards and we was off to theirs.
Gotta get me moose b’y!! 

Like to go a-moose hunting, hunting in the fall,
Like to go a-moose hunting, answer the hunting call:
“Gotta get me moose, b’y!”
 

Trottin’ on the bogs for miles with a pack sack on your back,
And you know he’s always just ahead, the fresh buttons in his tracks;
Well maybe he can hear us, b’ys, or maybe it’s his snout…
I allow it’s not hard to get a whiff of we after five or six days out!
Hah! Gotta get me moose, b’y!! 

Like to go a-moose hunting, hunting in the fall,
Like to go a-moose hunting, answer the hunting call:
“Gotta get me moose, b’y!”
 

At last we saw a great big bull and oh my, what a fuss!
Fired ten shots and had to run! He started chasing us. Hah!
But when we got him killed, me lads, I had to panch his gut!
Me manly hunting instinct left and me supper all heaved up.
Whoop! Gotta get me moose b’y!! 

Like to go a-moose hunting, hunting in the fall,
Like to go a-moose hunting, answer the hunting call:
“Gotta get me moose, b’y!”
 

Jack, we got to lug ‘im out, you were fine to have along,
But my next partner will be a wrestler, twice as big and strong;
And never again will I go out across the bog so far,
I’ll wait till I sees one on the road and I’ll wing ‘im with me car!!
Hah! That’s how I’ll get me moose, b’y!! 

Like to go a-moose hunting, hunting in the fall,
Like to go a-moose hunting, answer the hunting call:
“Gotta get me moose, b’y!”
 

I highly recommend if you are coming from a way and want a superior hunting and guiding experience, you will want to stay at the Tuckamore Lodge at Main Brook, NL. Check it out for yourself http://www.tuckamorelodge.com/ 

 

Moose Stew

MOOSE STEW 

  • 3 lbs moose, cut into small pieces
  • 1/4 lb butter
  • salt and pepper

Brow moose meat in hot butter. Add water, salt and pepper. Let simmer, adding chopped onion after about an hour of cooking. Cook for another hour. 

Then chop and add: 

  • 2 carrots
  • 1 small turnip
  • 5-10 potatoes

Cook for 30 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Make dumplings if you wish. 

Public safety is off the utmost importance. Although the government has increased moose hunting licences and noted they have purchased groomers and will be grooming parts of the province, are they doing enough? There have already been a number of moose vehicle collisions this year, as with any year. How many more do we need to have before the government steps up to the plate and follows other provinces, like New Brunswick and implements appropriate animal fencing?  

Safe and happy hunting in rural NL – CCM 

  

 

Brigus Blueberry Festival

Beautiful Brigus

Newfoundland & Labrador is well-known for a summer of events, activities and festivals.

The Brigus Blueberry Festival is Award Winning and in its 23rd year! I dropped by this summer along with the other 17,000 plus visitors during August 12-15, 2010. It was my first time in historic Brigus on this lovely Sunday afternoon. The event coordinators expected a large crowd and had made the main streets one way to help with the flow of traffic. It took a little while to get a packing space, as it seemed everyone was arriving at the same time.  After safely parking in a large field, I was not disappointed as I walked through the streets of this quaint town that boasts beautiful vernacular heritage architecture. There were large crowds and great photo opportunities.

The festival activities include: A Royal Shag Up” – comedy dinner theatre, Steps Through Time - walking tour, Newfie night with Screech Ins, community breakfasts, dinners, and suppers, a two-day Folk Festival with well-known Newfoundland talent, visits by Miss Teen Newfoundland and Labrador and Miss Newfoundland and Labrador, the Missed Blueberry Pageant, raffles, craft stalls, baked goods, a pie eating contest, games of chance, mooseburgers, cash bar, children’s games, dances, and fireworks at the Brigus Waterfront. (http://www.brigus.net/blue.htm)

The waterfront

We stopped to have a mooseburger and beer, which went down very nicely! It was followed by a good drop of moose soup. It was good, but not comparable to my grandmothers…she makes the world’s best! There was a large queue to enter. The toll was $2.00 for the complete weekend pass. A number of booths and stands were set-up with local artisans, organizations and entrepreneurs selling their wares. We made our way pass the many games of chance and listened to some traditional Newfoundland music.

We decided to drive through Cupids, celebrating 400 years as the oldest Town in English North America! As well as visit Carbonear and Harbour Grace. The SS Kyle still remains aground as you enter this town.

It was a wonderful day, filled with lots of fun, food, sounds and sights! I recommend you to put the Brigus Blueberry Festival on your list of things to do. So make sure you mark your calendars for the 24th annual in August 2011!

Live Rural NL – CCM

HAVE A SCOFF – Gourmet Cooking, Newfoundland Style

A recent vacation, led me to visit the pristine oasis of Main Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador. If you ever have the opportunity, visit and stay awhile.
Tuckamore Lodge

 I decided to stop by the Tuckamore Lodge, a wilderness retreat located in the centre of a vast region of exceptional natural beauty. Upon stopping, I was greeted by the proprietor, Barb Genge and instantly invited into her home. She is a visionary.  I enjoy every conversation we are able to have with respect to  marketing, packaging, the industry and the great outdoors.  Yes, this woman is a titan for the Viking Trail and its remarkable tourism and outfitting offering. 

While at the Tuckamore Lodge, I was privileged to enjoy a great lunch, what a “scoff”. You see the cuisine of Newfoundland and Labrador is as diverse as the heritage. We have Jigg’s Dinner, Toutons, Mug-ups and various wild game and seafood dishes that have been passed on from generation to generation. Tuckamore staff strive to provide an experience to its customers and not just a nights accommodation, with the food being a big part of the experience. 

Juicy scallops, seared with hollandaise sauce

The Scandinavian Decor, placement setting and experienced staff set the mood and  atmosphere. Lunch was served; on thick slices of freshly baked homemade bread was a gourmet sandwich and  side salad so fresh, you would think the vegetables came from a backyard garden. Yes, this lunch was an unexpected treat and so was the dessert that followed. A bakeapple square with a heaping scoop of vanilla ice-cream. This was incredible, as I found my way into dessert heaven. It was so enjoyable to the tastebuds I asked the chef for the recipe. She provided it instantly, despite being very busy with a number of other tasks. Now that is exceptional customer service. I’ve since prepared the dessert, not really comparable to the first, but I will keep trying. If you would like to eat at Tuckamore, it would be best to make a reservation in advance. You will certainly not be disappointed. 

I wish, there was more time to inhale the natural beauty of the lake, the sights and sounds of nature and the great outdoors. The countryside teams with wildlife: moose, caribou, black bears, salmon, trout, birds and other animals. Truly, something for everyone – the nature enthusiast, photographer, eco-tourist, hunter and anyone who would like to get-a-way from it all without having to “rough it” since there is a sauna, billiards room, hot tub, library, fitness equipment and more… 

Check out their website and see it for yourself: http://www.tuckamorelodge.com/ 

A Recommended Rural Retreat - 

CCM

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