Blog Archives

A Feed of Fish n’ Brewis

Fish & Brewis is a traditional Newfoundland Specialty. I enjoyed this meal of fish, brewis and boiled potatoes on January 5th, 2012.

I’ll share with you the recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 4 Cakes Purity Hard Bread
  • 2 lb salt cod fish
  • 1 cup of salt pork (finely diced)
  • Drawn Butter: 1/4 Cup Butter, 2 Med. Onions (chopped), 2 tbsp Water, 1 Cup Water (Optional)

Soak Hard Bread overnight. Use lots of water. Soak cod-fish in a separate bowl overnight. In the morning change water and cook cod-fish for about 15 minutes. Remove from heat and drain. Put hard bread in saucepan with water to cover and bring to a boil. Remove Hard Bread from heat and drain. Optional Add cooked flaked fish and mix if you would like what is called Fisherman’s Brewis. Keep hot. Fry pork until golden brown and crisp, serve with fish and brews.).

Drawn butter: melt butter in saucepan, add onions  and  fry until golden and soft. Do not brown. Sprinkle flour over mixture and mix thoroughly. Remove from heat. Stir in half water. Place on heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Beat until shiny and smooth. Slowly add remaining water, cook over low heat 2 to 3 minutes. Serve over fish and brewis.

My friends from Europe certainly enjoyed our traditional Newfoundland & Labrador cuisine.

Love Rural NL -

Christopher C. Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

Newfoundland Seal Flipper Pie Recipe

While everyone awaits the development of a local seal flipper food stand., I will share with you all a Newfoundland Seal Flipper Pie Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 2 seal flippers
  • 1 small turnip
  • 3 carrots, sliced
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 1 parsnip, sliced
  • 2 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 ounce Newfoundland Screech
  • 1/2 lb fat back pork
  • 2 tbsp vinegar
  • salt & pepper to taste

Dumpling Pastry – Ingredients:

Directions:

  1.  Cut all fat and slag from flippers.
  2. Place them in a deep dish with enough boiling water to cover.
  3. Add vinegar and set aside to cool, then wipe dry with paper towel and place in baking pan or large casserole dish.
  4. Add pepper and salt to taste.
  5. Cover with sliced onions and sliced fat pork.
  6. Dribble Newfoundland Screech over contents.
  7. Cover and bake in pre-heated oven at 375 degrees F for 2 hours.
  8. Boil turnip, carrots and parsnip in 2 1/2 cups of water for about 20 minutes.
  9. When vegetables are ready, place in baking dish with flippers.
  10. Use vegetable water for gravy and thicken with flour.
  11. Make dumpling pastry and pat over flippers and vegetables.
  12. Cover and bake gently until pastry is done. This should take approximately 15 minutes.

Enjoy traditional seal flipper pie.

Live Rural NL -

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

Grandmother Mitchelmore….How does your garden grow?

Planted beds of small seed in Grandma's Garden

My Grandmother Mitchelmore has been planting a garden for a lifetime. At 79 years young she knows that around the end of May, there is a flurry of activity to attend to the ground. She plants potatoes, turnip, carrot, onions and cabbage to ensure that she can prepare her traditional Jigg’s Dinner throughout the year. She also maintains a strawberry patch, which at times I am tempted to raid.

I grew up helping my grandparents in the garden and always enjoyed the harvest. I remember Grandmother and I were digging all the potatoes and she got a supersize tater. I dug frantically trying to match her giant spud. I did dig up a larger potato, but it definitely would not win a beauty contest.

Today she helped me continue to attempts to grow a variety of vegetables locally. We planted onion, red onion, green onion and baby carrots. Tomorrow, I will plant lettuce plants in addition to my already planted tomatoes, green peppers, red peppers and asparagus.

Grandmother planting onions with me today

There seems to have been a generational gap among those of my parents age, as many did not adapt the skills required to maintain a garden. However, there is hope as younger generations appear to have a strong interest in growing vegetables. Rural communities have an opportunity to utilize this interest as a means to share space and offer community gardens. Experienced elders can teach those younger the necessary skills to have a successful growing season.

Get your garden growing this season. It is not to late to start on the Great Northern Peninsula.

Live Rural NL -

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,242 other followers

%d bloggers like this: