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Newfoundland Bakeapple Cheesecake Recipe

Bakeapple, the Cloudberry or the Chicouté is a delightful wild berry that grows on the marshes of the Great Northern Peninsula, Labrador and other parts of Northerly climates. Late July-early August is a great time to head to the barrens with your jugs and buckets to get some for yourself. The other option may be to purchase them at roadside.

I enjoy the berry in a pie, served with vanilla ice-cream but especially served as part of a Cheesecake. I’ve been using the following recipe for a while and decided to share it with you:

Crust
1/2 cup butter, melted
1 1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs
1/4 cup sugar

Filling
16 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
3 eggs, separated
1/2 cup sugar
2 tablespoons flour, all-purpose
1/2 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup blend cream (10%) or undiluted evaporated milk
2/3 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon lemon rind (zest)
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/4 cup sugar
2 cups bakeapple jam or sauce

Bakeapple Sauce
2 cups bakeapples
water
1 cup sugar
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/4 cup water

Crust
- Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease 9-inch spring-form pan.
- Melt butter, add crumbs and sugar; mix until mixture is moist and crumbly. Press against bottom and sides of greased springform pan. Bake 10-12 minutes at 350°F. Cool.

Filling
Reduce oven temperature to 325°F. Beat cream cheese well. Beat in egg yolks, then add l/2 cup sugar, Dour and salt. Beat well. Add cream, vanilla, lemon rind and juice; beat mixture until free from lumps.

In a clean bowl, beat egg whites until they reach the soft-peak stage. Beat in 1/4 cup sugar and continue beating until whites are stiff but not dry. Fold egg whites into cream cheese mixture.

Pour cream cheese mixture into baked crumb crust and bake at 325°F for 40-60 minutes or until it sets. The mixture will be a bit quivery when removed from the oven, but will set as it cools.

Cool cheesecake to room temperature, apply bakeapple sauce over the top, then refrigerate until serving (preferably 3-4 hours).

Bakeapple Sauce
Simmer bakeapples in a little water until tender, about 10 minutes. Add sugar and simmer another 5 minutes.

Mix cornstarch with enough water to form a paste. Stir into bakeapples and continue stirring until thickened and smooth.

Please visit http://newfoundland.ws for more superb recipes of Newfoundland & Labrador cuisine.

A visit to a restaurant in Newfoundland & Labrador, especially during summer will likely have this berry in a dessert, alcoholic beverage or as a garnish to a main course. Embrace the bakeapple along with so many residents of the Great Northern Peninsula – it truly is a treat that will tantalize the taste buds.

Live Rural NL -

Christopher C. Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

Molasses Raisin Bread Recipe

Ingredients -

Dissolved yeast in 1 cup lukewarm water, to which the 2 tsp. sugar has already been added.

Ingredients -

  1.  Combine 3 cups of lukewarm water, molasses and melted butter.
  2. Sift dry ingredients together.
  3. Add raisins to dry ingredients.
  4. Stir dissolved yeast into molasses mixture.
  5. Stir flour mixture into molasses mixture and knead for 10-12 minutes.
  6. Place in a greased bowl and let rise until it doubles in size, which will take approximately 2 1/2 hours.
  7. Divide dough to form into loaves.
  8. Place in greased loaf pans and let rise for 1 hour.
  9. Bake at 350 degrees F for about 1 hour. Baking time may vary.
  10. When you take hot bread from oven, remove from pan, grease with butter and let cool.

Enjoy Your Molasses Raisin Bread!

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

Cuban Vacation…Part III

After a whopping breakfast, which included Canadian Maple Syrup we headed for the train station. It was a delight to see a product of Canada, most likely produced in Quebec as it is the World’s Largest Producer of Maple Syrup. I made sure to have some on my miniature pancakes.

1926 Engine That Could!

We headed for the train station to board Train 1590 that was built in 1926. The locomotive was fed by wood, which would take us slowly, but surely to the sugar mills.I was quite excited on the journey as we had the opportunity to ride with the conductor near the train’s boiler.

The rural countryside offered picturesque views, yet also displayed the harsh realities that rural regions are used for the natural resources, primarily agricultural. It made me reflect on my love rural living. We are producers and providers of commodities, which enable larger urban areas to enjoy the standards they have as service centres. It is time to ensure that rural regions maintain a high standard of living and have access to essential services.

We climbed “Lookout Tower” at the cost of 1 C.U.C. to provide an aerial view of the once thriving sugar plantations.

It was an excellent opportunity to take some photo ops.

A view from the tower fo the nearby houses and fields in the background:

A street of vendors selling locally made craft product. There was an abundance of linens, such as lovely embroidered tablecloths for sale.

Someone even enjoyed a beer on the journey and left it on a wooden beam as we descended the stairwell.

The Tower had circular viewing holes. Here is one of the train waiting:

The train ride continued and so did the adventure of my Cuban vacation. Stay tuned for Cuban Vacation…Part IV.

Live Rural NL -

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

Recipes From Grandma Pearl – Raisin Buns

I stand by the fact that my Grandmother Pearl is a wonderful baker. One of the enjoyable baked goods I love is a good raisin bun with a cup of tea. This makes for a quick breakfast or a nice snack at break time.

Ingredients

Directions -

Mix all dry ingredients together except custard powder. Add to milk. Add butter to dry ingredients and beat eggs. Add to dry mixture. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes. Yields approximately 2 1/2 dozen buns.

Molasses Buns & Tea`

Now you have the opportunity to make your own. If you would rather purchase this traditional foodstuff, you can stop by the Gros Morne Resort Gas Bar, St. Paul’s, NL. They sell a limited selection of baked bread, buns and rolls.  Six raisin buns sell for a low price of $2.99 or twelve for $5.00.

 
Enjoy!
 
Live Rural NL -
Christopher C. Mitchelmore
 
 
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