Category Archives: Newfoundland Recipes

Recipes From Grandma Pearl – Raisin Buns

I stand by the fact that my Grandmother Pearl is a wonderful baker. One of the enjoyable baked goods I love is a good raisin bun with a cup of tea. This makes for a quick breakfast or a nice snack at break time.

Ingredients

Directions –

Mix all dry ingredients together except custard powder. Add to milk. Add butter to dry ingredients and beat eggs. Add to dry mixture. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes. Yields approximately 2 1/2 dozen buns.

Molasses Buns & Tea`

Now you have the opportunity to make your own. If you would rather purchase this traditional foodstuff, you can stop by the Gros Morne Resort Gas Bar, St. Paul’s, NL. They sell a limited selection of baked bread, buns and rolls.  Six raisin buns sell for a low price of $2.99 or twelve for $5.00.

 
Enjoy!
 
Live Rural NL –
Christopher C. Mitchelmore
 
 

Apple, Walnut and Blue Cheese Salad with Lingonberry Vinaigrette

The Lingonberry in Rural Newfoundland & Labrador is referred to locally as the “Partridgeberry”.

After reviewing From Our Atlantic Woods –Non-Timber Forest Product Directory 2009-2010, a recipe supplied by Pure Labrador seemed like a delicious use of for local berries.

Apple, Walnut and Blue Cheese Salad with Lingonberry Vinaigrette (Serves 4)

Ingredients (Vinaigrette)

Directions –

Mix all together and shake well

Ingredients (Salad)

  • Mixed baby salad greens
  • 1 apple
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) crumbled blue cheese

Directions –

  1. Spread a bed of salad greens on 4 plates
  2. Core and quarter the apple
  3. Thinly slice each quarter into 6-8 slices and place on the greens in an attractive fan
  4. Sprinkle 1 tbsp (15 ml) each walnuts and blue cheese over the apple and greens
  5. Drizzle the Lingonberry Vinaigrette over the salads.

 I am looking forward to trying this salad, which will have local wild berries. Be creative with locally grown products and start your own FOOD REVOLUTION!

Rabbit Soup on Saturday

 

Wild Rabbit Soup

The utilities company noted they would be doing some upgrades to the main power line, leaving local residents from Castor River to Eddies Cove without electricity until 11:00 AM. This delayed my traditional lunch at grandma’s house.
 
 Early in the morning, I lit a fire. The heat from locally cut wood, provided much warmth. I did some chores and brought out some light trash. I dropped in to visit my grandmother, who faithfully had the pot on the stove and noted she was cooking “Rabbit Soup”, but it would not be ready until about 1:30 PM. We chatted for a bit  and she had also proudly showed me all her knitting. She certainly keeps quite busy.

Rabbit

The table was prepared, with homemade bread, the salt & pepper shakers, the rabbit had been taken from the pot and soup ready to be poured into each bowl. The rabbit was delicious. My grandmother and I always have a good chat, whether it is about the hockey game, curling, gardening, weather or past times. I had told her I was looking at old photos earlier, some of which included my grandfather, father and of  course my childhood.RabbitMany good memories.
 
I enjoy traditional recipes of rural Newfoundland. My grandmother and I discussed how traditions are dying as far fewer people of the younger generations are cooking with wild game. Modernization and the convenience of pre-packaged food is having an impact on the dishes that have been served on Newfoundland tables for centuries.
 

 

RECIPE FOR NEWFOUNDLAND RABBIT SOUP
 
 1 lb. Salt beef
2 qts of cold water
1 Wild game rabbit (cleaned and cut up)
3 carrots
1 lb turnip
4 med. Potatoes
1 med. Onion
few drips of gravy browning
3 ½ – 4 qts. Cold water
 
Cut salt beef into small pieces. Place in large saucepan and add 2 qts. cold water. Bring to a boil. Place salt beef, rabbit and remaining 3 ½ qts (cook 1 ½ hours). Add vegetables  and browning. Cook 30 minutes.
 
Bon Apetit!
 
Live Rural NL 0
Christopher Mitchelmore
 
 

Fisherman’s Brewis for Sunday Dinner

Cod fish soaking

The fish has been soaking the night prior. Whenever a Newfoundlander says “fish” he is referring to cod fish. If he is talking about other types of fish, he will call it by name.

Today for dinner, I was able to enjoy a great meal of Fisherman’s Brewis.

Brewis, Fish, Potatoes and Fried Pork and Onions

The recipe is simple, yet big on delivery. You need hard tack (Famous Purity Hard Bread). This should be soaked in cold water until soft. We used three cakes for our meal. We had some already filleted cod, so we did not need to be as worried about the bones. One must fry fat port until a little brown.

Preparing Fisherman’s Brewis

Cook fish, add the hard bread and mash it all together and served. This meal can be cooked within a short 20 minutes.

 
We had a side of boiled potatoes, homemade pickles and buttered or Crosbie Molasses “Lassie” bread. 
 
Fisherman’s Brewis Spread

This is a treat to the standard brewis on Sunday, when hot dinner is not being served.

 
The conversation was around how we should have this heritage meal more often.
 
After the meal, I steeped a cup of Screech tea made locally by The Dark Tickle Company, St. Lunaire-Griquet on the Great Northern Peninsula.
Screech Tea from Dark Tickle Company

There is truly something great about Living Rural and enjoying traditional recipes that have been mainstays of Rural Life for centuries.

 
Live Rural NL 0
Christopher Mitchelmore

NL Moose Soup on Saturday

Saturday in Rural Newfoundland, has long been known as Soup Saturday. In September 2009, I returned to my community on the island of Newfoundland. Since that time, I continue my previous tradition of visiting my grandmother who makes soup every Saturday to enjoy a drop.

Moose Soup from Grandma's Kitchen

She makes traditional split pea soup, turkey neck, rabbit, partridge and my favourite – Moose Soup.

I love the flavour of the all the garden vegetables mixed with salt meat (beef) and of course the moose. I also love the fact that she adds macaroni noodles. Those who know me well, know I enjoy macaroni in my soup. In fact, my Aunt Viola always added extra to her soup when she knew I was coming over.

Moose Meat from the Soup

When I enter my grandmother’s kitchen on Saturday, she had the moose meat placed on the table, salt & pepper shakers are always in the same location, homemade bread is sliced and strawberry flavoured drink mix readily available.  One has to dig in and can not simply stop at one bowl.

Freshly Sliced Homemade Bread

Soup is a great dinnertime meal (we do not call it lunch in Rural Newfoundland), especially when it is complimented by some of grandma’s freshly baked bread.

 
Over the cooling of the soup, we usually share memories of the past, talk about my grandfather, family and days from my grandmother’s childhood.
 
Tetley Tea & Biscuits

We continue the conversation over a cup of Tetley Tea after our meal and marshmallow biscuits that I’ve enjoyed at grandma’s ever since I can remember.

 
I just called asking for the recipe, which all spoken like a true Newfoundland cook, not with exact measurements.
 
She uses moose meat, with some bone (if possible), a handful of salt beef in a 4 qrt. pot adding water and letting simmer for a couple of hours. She dices carrot, turnip and potatoes (about 3 or 4 handfuls) and adds to the pot for about 45 minutes. A chopped onion is added. She adds 1/4 cup of rice and macaroni for about 20 minutes. She adds a can of tomato soup and beef oxo cup for additional flavour. Grandma’s secret recipe is out! I’ll still prefer her pot to mine any day.
 
This is one tradition, I am happy to continue as I live in Rural Newfoundland and will cherish always.
 
Live Rural NL 0
Christopher Mitchelmore
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