Another Reason to Live Rural Newfoundland & Labrador

There are many reasons to Live Rural NL – the image above is certainly one of those. This winter scene from Croque, NL instantly brought warm feelings and a smile to my face, despite the cold day of January 24, 2012.

The proportion of snow on the rooftops of the fishing rooms is the perfect contrast to the slowly fading red paint. It is evident the burgeoning fishery is in decline. Although, the community like Grandois, faces a decreasing population – it offers endless opportunities for tranquility and is a photographers dream.

Croque is 20 km via gravel road from neighbouring Main Brook. This community has a French cemetery, waterfront properties, walking trails and many natural wonders.

Experience the Great Northern Peninsula –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

About Live Rural NL

I am a youth living in rural Newfoundland & Labrador that will share stories of culture, tradition, heritage, business, travel, geography and other posts relating to any rural. I completed a Bachelor of Commerce Hons. (Coop) degree from Memorial University of Newfoundland & Labrador. I currently live and work on the Great Northern Peninsula, where I was born and raised. However, I have lived and worked internationally and travelled to more than 30 countries around the globe. On October 11, 2011 I was elected the youngest Member to Represent the people of the Straits -White Bay North in the Provincial Legislature of Newfoundland & Labrador.

Posted on February 7, 2012, in French Shore, Landscapes/Geography and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

  1. beautiful — scenes like this really make me homesick

  2. Any suggestions on ways to support oneself in this rural lifestyle? The vast majority of people in the region work less than 20 weeks a year! Croque has even lost its school. Without massive subsidies and EI many of these communities would no longer exist. Traditional fishing communities are mine towns.. taking away the industry and continuing to prop them up is doing nothing but eroding the financial basis for our province, beautiful as they may be. Rural Newfoundland and Labrador will always have a place, but I do think targeted resettlement should be a gov. priority.

    • There are many ways to support oneself in a rural setting. There are opportunities for co-operatives, agriculture & ranching, consulting companies, professional services, on-line services, smale-scale manufacturing, transportation services, tourism offerings and others. A good co-operative plan is needed to re-vitalize rural communities – it will take all stakeholders to sit at the same table. Much work is needed to be done to plan for the future.

  3. Francis R. Reardon

    Chris,
    I am so happy to see my place in Croque featured on your site.
    The last of the Croque skiffs is the Skippers Promise. The stores were McDonald Sons. I purchased the property in 1976 and I am trying to maintain it as a heritage site.
    Long before you, I ran in the elections in 1988 for the PC’s. I am glad for you and I wish you all the best in the future.
    Francis

  1. Pingback: Newfoundland & Labrador: Where the World’s Weirdest Place Names Live | Kash in Transit

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