Author Archives: Live Rural NL

A Day on the Farm – Roddickton, NL

 The Farm is a special place in the Town of Roddickton that has a strong connection to Dr. Grenfell and the important work of the International Grenfell Association (IGA) that dates back to circa 1915 and was another initiative to improve the health and economic status in the region.

The family name Adams is a common one in the community. It was Kenneth Adams, that came at the request of Dr. Grenfell to establish a farm in the Canada Bay area, after several successful attempts in St. Anthony. The Adams family operated a farm until about 1930, but the remnants of the old well remains even today.

During World War II the Canadian Forces established a radar site at The Farm and was abandoned after the war. Today, the Farm is a beloved community park with so much potential for further development of green space and other economic opportunities. The Farm is truly a gem in this community for gathering and enjoying the great outdoors.

This summer, I trekked the 5 km loop trail that offers a spectacular nature walk where one can experience wildlife, a cool ocean breeze and a fantastic view of the mountains known as The Pinnacle. Here are some photos! I even saw a fox but didn’t capture the beautiful animal with a photo.

The first farm established by Kenneth Adams may have been started over 100 years ago. It proved that such agricultural activities were possible and many others have established their own gardens, greenhouses, ranching or other farm activity in the region. There is so much more potential for increased agriculture on our Great Northern Peninsula, especially in Roddickton.

If you have never taken the time to enjoy the Farm, its incredible surroundings and the important place in history on the Great Northern Peninsula East and its development, I encourage you to do so! The 5 KM walk is just impressive!

Live Rural NL,

Christopher Mitchelmore

Sculpin Cones & Berry Ice-cream a Specialty at Cafe Nymphe

The Dark Tickle Company of St. Lunaire-Griquet is famous for their use of locally harvested wildberries that create specialty jams and jellies. They have continuously expanded their product line to include teas, coffees, vinegarettes, spreads, chocolate covered berries, sauces and more. This business is an econo-musee, the enables you to watch how their products are manufactured right before your eyes. They also have an incredible gift shop, which is en route to L’anse aux Meadows. It is a must visit tourism establishment when you are visiting the Great Northern Peninsula.

The business also hosts the Grandchain Exhibit, which highlights the French connection to the region.

This exhibit has been transformed from a static display to become the historical cafe. The carrot cake with partridgeberry sauce is to die for and they serve up delicious soups, salads, paninis, pizzas, fish cakes and even Swedish meatballs on their menu. It is truly a trendy place to go to enjoy a great cup of java in summer, or savour some wildberry milkshakes or beverages and great berry infused desserts. They position themselves differently and french fries is not on the menu. It is wonderful to have a variety of great food options during the summer tourism season. On certain days some live music or even recitations would be available to patrons.

The company has remained true to their brand and this past year, they added a new innovative product, called the sculpin cone and various flavours of berry ice-cream. It was nothing short of a being a hit and likely the go to place this summer, especially for locals to have a new and unique experience.

I enjoyed their bakeapple. partridgeberry and blueberry flavours, as well as vanilla. The simple addition of ice-cream proved to be a phenomenal hit for marketing and bringing customers to their venue but also to the Great Northern Peninsula. It’s important that we always look for new ways to be creative, to stand out and to innovate. It was also very fascinating to see so many images surface on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and mainstream media of people proudly holding their sculpin cones and promoting the business and our Great Northern Peninsula as a must visit destination.

The 2020 tourism season was not your typical year in the face of a global pandemic and very stringent travel restrictions. It does give business owners and travellers an opportunity to pause and make some changes to how their business operates and what it can do differently in 2021. The message is simple, it is more imperative than ever to find a way to support your local small businesses.

Be sure to get your sculpin cone and other berry treats at the Dark Tickle Company. If you can’t visit in person, you can always visit their online store and get some great products shipped. We look forward to seeing you and you certainly won’t be disappointed on your visit.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore

At least 80 reasons to visit our Great Northern Peninsula!

I’ve put together a list of walking/hiking trails and lookouts on the Great Northern Peninsula from Bellburns and all communities to the North. I’ll be linking these with posts with images and more information on each trail as I am able to update. In 2020, I created a challenge to get them all completed, so now I encourage you all to join the challenge when you visit the Great Northern Peninsula for yourself.

Quirpon Island
Table Point Ecological Reserve, north of Bellburns
  • Trails from Bellburns to Reef’s Harbour (GNP Central-South):
  • Table Point Ecological Reserve (between Bellburns and River of Ponds)
  • River of Ponds Walking Trails
    • trail to the beach 3 km
    • trail to big pond (section still under development)
  • Hawke’s Bay
    • John Hogan Trail, 6.4 km
  • Port Saunders
    • Crow Head Walking Trail
    • Demonstration Forest
    • Beach Trail (through subdivision)
  • Port au Choix
    • Dorset Trail
    • Coastal Trail
    • Phillip’s Garden Trail
    • Point Riche Trail
    • Barbace Cove Trail
  • Bartlett’s Harbour
    • White Point Walking Trail
  • New Ferolle
    • Old Ferolle Lighthouse Trail
  • Reef’s Harbour
    • St. Margaret’s Bay Trail
White Point Walking Trail, Bartlett’s Harbour
  • Trails from Plum Point to Eddies Cove East (GNP West):
  • Bird Cove
    • Dog Peninsula Trail
    • Long Pond Trail
  • Plum Point
    • Basque Site Boardwalk
    • Mount St. Margaret Ski Club and Trails
    • St. Genevieve River Trail
  • St. Barbe to Forrester’s Point (interconnected trail network)
    • St. Barbe Trail
    • Pigeon Cove Trail
    • Black Duck Cove Trail
    • Forrester’s Point Trail
  • Anchor Point
    • Deep Cove Trail
    • Deep Cove Trail extension to gazebo and beach
    • Deep Cove Ski Club and Trails
  • Flower’s Cove
    • White Rocks Walking Trail and Extension
    • Marjorie Bridge and Thrombolites Trail
  • Nameless Cove
    • Flower’s Island Lighthouse Trail
  • Sandy Cove
    • Ecological Reserve for Longs Braya
Captain James Cook Cairn, Dog Peninsula, Bird Cove
  • Trails from Englee to Croque (GNP East):
  • Englee
    • Barr’d Island Trail
    • Locker’s Point Trail
    • White Point Trail
    • Shoe Pond Hill Trail
  • Roddickton
    • Heritage Trail
    • The Farm
    • Underground Salmon Hole
  • Bide Arm
    • Armistice Park Trail
  • Conche
    • Sailor Jack’s Hill Lookout
    • Glass Hole
    • Fox Head Trail
    • Captain Coupelongue Trail
    • Sleepy Cove Trail
  • Croque
    • Epine Corderant Trail
  • Main Brook
    • Main Brook Park Rugged Trails
The view from the gazebo, Shoe Cove Trail, Englee
  • St. Anthony Basin Region (GNP North)
  • North Boat Harbour
    • Highlands Boardwalk
  • Wild Bight
    • Whale Point Trail
    • Cape Norman Lighthouse
  • Cook’s Harbour
    • Garge Coates’ Lookout
  • Goose Cove East
    • Pumbley Cove Trail
  • St. Anthony
    • Bottom Brook Trails
    • Lamage Point
    • Tea House Hill
    • American Base Trail
    • Dare Devil Trail
    • Cartier’s Trail
    • Whale Watcher’s Trail
    • Santana Trail
    • Iceberg Alley Trail
  • St. Anthony Bight
    • St. Anthony Point Loop
    • Silver Point Trail
  • St. Carol’s
    • John Patey Trail
  • Great Brehat
    • Flat Point Trail
    • Little Brehat Walking Trail
  • Triple Falls Trail (Route 430), 0.8 km
  • Aurora Nordic Ski Club and Trails
  • Raleigh
    • Burnt Cape Ecological Reserve
    • Cannon Holes and Big Oven Hike
    • Nuddick Trail
  • Ship Cove
    • Treena’s Trail
    • Album Rock
  • St. Lunaire-Griquet
    • Gull Pond Municipal Park
    • St. Brendan’s Trail
    • Dog Head Trail
    • Camel’s Back Trail
  • L’anse aux Meadows
    • Birchy Nuddick Trail
    • Norstead Trail
    • Lacey’s Trail
    • Beginning of the Iceberg Trail
  • Gunner’s Cove
  • Hay Cove
    • Noddy Bay Head Trail
  • Straitsview
    • Cape Raven Trail
  • Noddy Bay
    • Squidjigging Point Trail
  • Quirpon
  • The Iceberg Trail (multi-day)
  • International Appalachian Trail
Sea Cave on Lacey’s Trail at L’anse aux Meadows

If there is a trail I’ve missed, please let me know and I’ll make an update. The Great Northern Peninsula, north of Gros Morne National Park and the gateway to Labrador offers visitors and residents hundreds of kilometres of trails and very unique experiences. There is beauty around every corner and so much to experience and explore when on a nature walk, hiking trail or a look-out.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore #NeverStopExploring

Finding (Abandoned) Fortune on the GNP!

The Great Northern Peninsula has a network of incredible hiking trails that pull people to explore Gros Morne National Park, Port au Choix National Historic Site and L’anse aux Meadows World UNESCO Heritage site as anchor areas of attraction. The portion of the peninsula north of Bellburns has more than 80 walking and hiking trails to explore. I set a challenge to complete them all, but it wasn’t until nearly the end of summer I got complete it by finding abandoned Fortune!

The Iceberg Trail is being developed from L’anse aux Meadows to St. Lunaire-Griquet, which connects current community walking trails to create a multi-day trail network. The views and experience is truly remarkable and a gem like the East Coast Trail.

On September 6th we left from Quirpon Tickle and go around the Cobbler to the abandoned community of Fortune. We left 9:30 AM and arrived at noon (8 KM). The trail is well-marked, except at the beginning (you have to go right at Quirpon intersection, passed the community hall and drive to the end of the road and park. The trail is rated as hard on AllTrails, what an incredible experience!

Fortune was a small fishing community nestled between Quirpon and Gunner’s Cove. There remains one family home that is still standing, while others had collapsed. There are some outer buildings and the remains of an old motor in the beach. The community may not have residents currently, but it truly was worth the trek and allowed me to complete my trail challenge.

We picked a spot on a flat rock overlooking the bay and enjoyed our sandwich made with homemade bread and lots of other snacks to refuel our energy levels. There were a few moose, likely looking for their lunch too! After a rest we did a little exploring and even picked up some beach glass before heading to Gunner’s Cove.

We left the abandoned community of Fortune and headed to Gunner’s Cove or Route 436 which was a 5.8 KM trek from Fortune. The trail was clearly marked and skirted along the beach. It would however be difficult to find the beginning from Route 436 as there is no trail marker at roadside. The views along the beach were a lovely contrast to the views of the coastline earlier. There was also one giant rock by a very tall tree, lots of berries, mushrooms and other natural beauty! The rock must have been placed either by giants or glaciers. The trail needs some modest improvements, so that one won’t even get wet feet or bring gear better than sneakers.

The Abandoned Community of Fortune as part of the Iceberg Trail trekking form Quirpon to Gunner’s Cove is 13.8 KM. Without a second vehicle or someone to drop you off or pick you up there is another 3.5 KM of walking back to Quirpon. Thankfully a local stopped and gave me a ride from Gunners Cove back to my car in Quirpon. That type of kindness was the icing on the cake to top off a wonderful day. To celebrate we had Vinland martinis and a Sacred Island Burger at the Norseman Fine Dining Restaurant at L’anse aux Meadows.

We may have even dropped by the Dark Tickle Company in St. Lunaire-Griquet for a sculpin cone and their berry ice-cream for dessert.

The Great Northern Peninsula is full of unique experiences, either in the great outdoors or when supporting a local small business. Be sure to add the abandoned community of Fortune on your list when you plan your journey!

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore #NeverStopExploring

Expansion of Cellular Service on GNP another Success Story!

Today, is another game changer for our Great Northern Peninsula! The community of Conche joined 10 others (Bay de Verde, Burin, Burlington, Cow Head, Cox’s Cove, Forteau, Hampden, McIvers, Trout River and Winterton) in Newfoundland and Labrador that will see new or enhanced cellular service.

This is a big deal for a community at the heart of the French Shore that has a strong fishing community and has been diversifying its offering to include hospitality, tourism and cultural products. 2020 saw internet improvements and 2021 will also see the completion of paving on Route 434, as it was scheduled to be done in 2020 but the tendered work did not get completed before the end of the construction season. Conche will now be well positioned to compete in the 21st century and have opportunities for further growth. I wrote an article in 2014 entitled, “The Fire Still Burns – Conche, NL”. Although there have been changes over the years since that article, new businesses have opened and now with these investments there will be new opportunity in this region. An investment of cellular service can only help attract more visitors and residents to the Great Northern Peninsula!

Conche – The view from Sailor Jack’s Hill

I firmly believe that we must invest in advancing our transportation and telecommunications networks to remain competitive and enable rural economies to have the successful tools they need to thrive.

In 2018, it was truly a pleasure to serve as Minister of Tourism, Culture, Industry and Innovation and gain the necessary approvals to create the first of its kind cellular service pilot program. Budget 2018 allocated $1 million to the program which required a partnership with a provider and community/organization and a contribution of 25 percent from the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador. This initial program saw significant leverage and approvals for multiple communities on the tip of the Great Northern Peninsula (including L’anse aux Meadows, a World UNESCO site), Southeastern Labrador (including Red Bay, a World UNESCO site), Lark Harbour & York Harbour, various communities in St. Mary’s area, Bauline, Pouch Cove, King’s Point, Lord’s Cove and Francophone communities on the Port au Port peninsula.

Communities on the Great Northern Peninsula along Route 436, Route 437 and Route 430 have already reaped the benefits of cellular service, which means improved safety, enhanced quality of life, supports dozens of small businesses en route to L’anse aux Meadows World UNESCO Heritage Site, expand marketing potential and creates numerous other opportunities.

A trek along the Iceberg Trail, a multi-day hike from L’anse aux Meadows to St. Lunaire-Griquet including the abandoned community of Fortune or a trek to the Glass Hole in Conche will be much safer and I’m sure showing up more on Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter, Facebook or other social media channels when there is a signal. I’ll share with you in some upcoming posts incredible hiking adventures that you can have on the Great Northern Peninsula!

The Glass Hole – Conche, NL

The Great Northern Peninsula has come a long way in the last decade with dozens of communities connected to high-speed Internet and cellular service for the first time, Conche seeing its road into the community paved for the first time in 50 years and many other investments in roads, wharfs, airport and other vital infrastructure. To have strong rural economics it is vital to keep advancing these two pillars – Transportation and Telecommunications! Let’s keep building stronger communities!

Today is another great day for our Great Northern Peninsula!

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA for District of St. Barbe-L’anse aux Meadows

%d bloggers like this: