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Newfoundland Bakeapple Cheesecake Recipe

Bakeapple, the Cloudberry or the Chicouté is a delightful wild berry that grows on the marshes of the Great Northern Peninsula, Labrador and other parts of Northerly climates. Late July-early August is a great time to head to the barrens with your jugs and buckets to get some for yourself. The other option may be to purchase them at roadside.

I enjoy the berry in a pie, served with vanilla ice-cream but especially served as part of a Cheesecake. I’ve been using the following recipe for a while and decided to share it with you:

Crust
1/2 cup butter, melted
1 1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs
1/4 cup sugar

Filling
16 ounces or 500 Grams cream cheese, room temperature
3 eggs, separated
1/2 cup sugar
2 tablespoons flour, all-purpose
1/2 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup blend cream (10%) or undiluted evaporated milk
2/3 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon lemon rind (zest)
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/4 cup sugar
2 cups bakeapple jam or sauce

Bakeapple Sauce
2 cups bakeapples
water
1 cup sugar
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/4 cup water

Crust
– Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease 9-inch spring-form pan.
– Melt butter, add crumbs and sugar; mix until mixture is moist and crumbly. Press against bottom and sides of greased springform pan. Bake 10-12 minutes at 350°F. Cool.

Filling
Reduce oven temperature to 325°F. Beat cream cheese well. Beat in egg yolks, then add l/2 cup sugar, flour and salt. Beat well. Add cream, vanilla, lemon rind and juice; beat mixture until free from lumps.

In a clean bowl, beat egg whites until they reach the soft-peak stage. Beat in 1/4 cup sugar and continue beating until whites are stiff but not dry. Fold egg whites into cream cheese mixture.

Pour cream cheese mixture into baked crumb crust and bake at 325°F for 40-60 minutes or until it sets. The mixture will be a bit quivery when removed from the oven, but will set as it cools.

Cool cheesecake to room temperature, apply bakeapple sauce over the top, then refrigerate until serving (preferably 3-4 hours).

Bakeapple Sauce
Simmer bakeapples in a little water until tender, about 10 minutes. Add sugar and simmer another 5 minutes.

Mix cornstarch with enough water to form a paste. Stir into bakeapples and continue stirring until thickened and smooth.

Please visit http://newfoundland.ws for more superb recipes of Newfoundland & Labrador cuisine.

A visit to a restaurant in Newfoundland & Labrador, especially during summer will likely have this berry in a dessert, alcoholic beverage or as a garnish to a main course. Embrace the bakeapple along with so many residents of the Great Northern Peninsula – it truly is a treat that will tantalize the taste buds.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher C. Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

Deep Fried Ice-cream – A must have treat at the Daily Catch, St. Lunaire-Griquet, NL

On several occasions I have seen Deep Friend Ice-cream on menus at various restaurants and have wanted to try the dessert. However, the portion sizes are often quite large, leaving little room for the sweet delights.

The The Daily Catch Restaurant in St. Lunaire-Griquet, en route to L’Anse Aux Meadows (World UNESCO Heritage Site) specializes in seafood. The food is delightful. In fact, they were even mentioned in the Globe and Mail.

And on the Great Northern Peninsula where the Vikings settled long before Columbus sailed from Spain, a sophisticated little establishment called The Daily Catch in St. Lunaire-Griquet (www.thedailycatch.ca; 709-623-2295) is an oasis of finely prepared seafood. The basil-buttered salmon is on par with the very best in Water Street dining. (Source Article – Click)

This is a true gem of the North, with superior food, excellent menu options, great wine list and the atmosphere to match. I have enjoyed the pleasure of the cook’s culinary skills a few times at this venue. They produce inviting salads, savouring seafood mains and create a happy mood as the traditional Newfoundland & Labrador music plays in the background.

Today was my time to shine – I was prepared and would certainly get my must have treat of Deep Fried Ice-cream today.

I ordered up their Drink of the Day, which was a surprise concoction known only by the server. I was presented with a bakeapple flavoured martini, which had the traditional berries at the bottom and was topped off with real iceberg ice. The iceberg ice really adds to experience, with purity and crackles as the shards gently melt. In 2010, a Youth Ventures participant pursued bagging the shards of icebergs as ice to sell during summertime at a local service station. Why are we not selling the ice on a larger scale? Opportunity knocks.

As I awaited my appetizer – the steamed mussels,  I took notice of the two icebergs positioned perfectly in view of the two windows in front of where I was sitting.

I struck up a conversation with the table adjacent. We talked about icebergs, local area, opportunities, culinary experiences and more. It was so fluent that I did not take a picture of the delicious mussels. However, I would not forget to snap my first trial with delectable Deep Fried Ice-cream.

The dessert menu claimed this is a “Must Have Treat”. It had the option of being served with Partridgeberry or Bakeapple. I am a fan of the bakeapple, as I find the partridgeberry a little tart. Served with whipped cream, a generous portion of local berries and wrapped in a secret coating – certainly makes this a field trip for the taste buds.

A nicely brewed cup of coffee with deep friend ice-cream was a culinary experience. I only wondered if this could have been enhanced, if I added some of my Screech Chocolate Sauce, purchased earlier at the Dark Tickle Company just a short jaunt down the road.

I left the Daily Catch completely satisfied, which is no surprise. So local or  traveller alike, if  you have never tried this treat, you can at this venue for a price of $4.75.

Get lost in a world of experiences on the Great Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland & Labrador.

Live Rural NL

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

Twitter/LiveRuralNL

Bakeapple Jam, Vinegar and Tea

Freshly made "Bakeapple" jam at Dark Tickle

If you grew up in Rural NL part of the experience is tasting many of the locally grown berries, such as the partridgeberry (lingonberry), squashberry, gooseberry, and most of all for me the beloved bakeapple (cloudberry). I have fond memories of picking these berries on the marshes and barrens not too far from my home. I would have a small jug as a boy and my parents larger ones. My father would always have three or four times the amount I would pick. I look forward to when the bakeapples ripen again, sometime later this month to early August so I can start picking. The reward is fresh jam, pies, squares and toppings for icecream and cheesecake.

Yesterday, I had supper (supper is the evening meal) with my grandmother. We talked about bakeapples as she poured a heaping amount of freshly made fluffy “doughboys” (or dumplings), which we were about to eat with garden vegetables and salt meat. I love eating with my grandmother, she makes the best traditional foods, it may be her years of experience and knowledge not to follow every direction and still have it turned out as sweet and flavourful as the person she is today. A meal spurs lots of conversations as we discussed staples of yesteryear, gathering and harvesting from the land and how one learns to make bread, doughboys, jams and the like.

While on vacation on June 28, 2010 I decided to stop at The Dark Tickle Company, in very scenic St. Lunaire-Griquet and enroute to L’Anse au Meadows, National Historic and World UNESCO Heritage site. This is an economusuem. 

 

Producing Jam Behind Glass

An ECONOMUSEUM

® is a craft or agri-foods business whose products are the fruit of an authentic technique or know-how. The business showcases artisans and craft trades by offering an area for interpreting its production and by opening its doors to the public.   

ECONOMUSEUM®, which are self-financed through the sale of their products, make an innovative contribution to the cultural tourism sector. (Source: http://www.economusees.com/iens_en.cfm)

The owners, Steve and Gwen Knudsen have done a remarkable job of establishing a true working economuseum. As you enter the facility you can view a worker preparing product behind the glass, they also have a tasting station, various interpretative panels, inviting NL music and their Granchain Exhibit, which is the winner of the Manning Award, as well as a large gift shop with a variety of their products and other artists. These entrepreneurs have taken making preserves to a new level as they have greatly expanded and developed their products to include non-traditional items residents would not typically make from berries, these include teas, vinegars, sauces, syrups and chocolates. You can visit an incredible website to see for yourself and even order their products on-line. Check out: http://www.darktickle.com/. I was quite pleased with the cup of bakeapple tea and the blueberry infused NL Screech chocolates I purchased.

Tradition can be retained, but it can also evolve with the right mindset. Steve, Gwen and their family are part of that process. My hat goes off to people like these, that take simple ideas and turn them into something so wonderfully pleasant to enjoy. Their power of ingenuity and innovation has truly made me proud to say this business exists in Rural NL.

We need more people like Steve and Gwen, that will take a simple concept and create an experience. We have a rich culture and heritage that is unique and should be shared with others in today’s global world.

Live Rural NL…

We Will Grow and Prosper.

CCM –

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