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Heritage, Wildlife & Coastal Scenery at New Ferolle, Shoal Cove West & Reef’s Harbour

On a recent visit to New Ferolle, Shoal Cove West & Reef’s Harbour it was clear that this region offers Heritage, Wildlife & Coast Scenery. From the caribou to wood piles to water, we were surrounded by images of what makes rural Newfoundland & Labrador that authentic place we call home.
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New Ferolle is just 11 kilometers from Reef’s Harbour junction, on Route 430. The area uniquely separates St. Margaret’s Bay from St. John Bay with a tremendous view of the Long Range Mountains.

The residents that live in these three communities enjoy these sights on a near daily basis. Visitors to the region can also enjoy the fishing activity, walking trails, vernacular architecture and the New Ferolle lighthouse, built in 1912. The lighthouse was operated by the Beaudoin family of New Ferolle for three generations, until the lighthouse became automated in June 1992.

The Community of Reef’s Harbour has an economic engine that is sitting idle. This fish plant presents an opportunity to create jobs, produce high-value locally sourced seafood and stimulate the local economy. Why are we letting great assets with excellent wharfing infrastructure sit idle?

The fishery is the mainstay of these communities, as is the case for most on the tip of the Great Northern Peninsula.

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The lobster traps, boats, fishing gear, personal stages, wharves and access to the bay are clear highlights of a hub of activity that exists from early May and into summer. I managed to capture a growler or small iceberg in this photo as well.

Our small rural fishing communities are beautiful and full of value and untapped potential. I encourage you on your trek up the Great Northern Peninsula to experience it for yourself.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-White Bay North)

The Majestic Caribou is another reason to come and stay awhile…

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The Great Northern Peninsula is a magical place where many natural treasures are ever present. We are home to the Viking Settlement a World UNESCO site in L’Anse aux Meadows It is the very place where the world came full circle – an event more than 100,000 years in the making. It is also home to Gros Morne National Park, the Grenfell Legacy, a community of 50 centuries, the French Shore, economuseums, ecological reserves, destination trails, giant icebergs, whales, pristine waters for fishing, hunting and full of unique experiences.  We have a strong business community that caters to tourism and hospitality industries.

We are also home of the mighty caribou. Almost every trek I make on Route 430 between my home to the Northern Peninsula East or North to St. Anthony and surrounding area I am greeted by a herd of caribou at the St. Anthony airport.

If you have never had the opportunity to see this majestic animal, I encourage you to make the trek up the Great Northern Peninsula and stay awhile, we have weeks of adventure awaiting.

Live Rural NL,

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-Wheite Bay North

PASSING TIME IN TROUT RIVER, NL

Trout River is a small fishing town on the Great Northern Peninsula that continues with the tradition of rural living, evident from the many fishing boats, lobster traps, wharves, stages and even cardboard signs selling salt cod. It is a quaint place that is snuggled in a gentle cove surrounded by hills that extend to the Tablelands, which is a World UNESCO Heritage Site. If you would like to know more about Trout River, please visit their website at http://townoftroutriver.com/.

Those who continue to earning a living there, do so from the land and sea. Fishing communities are vibrant places, they are steeped in tradition and rich in folklore. It is wonderful to see the establishment of regular gatherings in this town, called “Passing Time in Trout River”, where local talents and musicians gather and share music, jokes, and stories. Every communities has a remarkable story to tell. In fact, my hometown of Green Island Cove utilized its gear shed to host a community kitchen party. It was quite a night of coming together and celebrating our song and dance. It was an incredible experience that could be replicated. Community is stronger when it embraces the talents of the people that live there. We must continue to share our knowledge and teach others our traditional ways, so that our rural living remains a very vibrant part of the future in a very fast past, technological modern-day world.

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Trout River also has the fortunes of the Tablelands, World UNESCO site at its doorstep. It is quite the place to visit, you certainly feel like on Mars, or maybe Arizona? Certainly not the Great North of Newfoundland & Labrador. If you haven’t been, add it to your bucket list.

Further north is L’Anse aux Meadows, another World UNESCO site, an event 100,000 years in the making where the world came full circle 1,000 years ago. Also across the Strait of Belle Isle, a short distance away is a third World UNESCO site, in the Basque Whaling Station of Red Bay, Labrador.

We have incredible assets on the Great Northern Peninsula and Southern Labrador that illustrate how meaningful these places are in the world in terms of geography, history to people. We have an incredible connection to the land and sea, and always will. When you come to Newfoundland & Labrador, be sure to pass some time in Trout River and make your way to the gems at the very tip of the Great Northern Peninsula.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North
@MitchelmoreMHA

The Red Rooms of Crouse

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A few weeks ago while in the Town of Conche, I just had to stop and admire all the fishing stages and rooms that dominate Crouse Drive.

These vernacular wooden buildings were commonplace, scattered all along the shores of the Great Northern Peninsula as the cod trade dominated the economy. These stages were the place of commerce, where men and women would engage in the process of preparing the cod on splitting tables and then begin the process of salting and drying fish. The fish would be scattered along the rocks or on flakes. The traditional colour was of the buildings was always the red ochre colour, but I’ve also seen paint brands calling it “fishermen red”.

These vernacular buildings are quintessentially rural Newfoundland & Labrador and reflective of our outport lifestyle, culture and heritage. Today marks the opening of the Fall Food Fishery, so if you get the opportunity to take to the water and jig a few cod think about the red rooms scattered along the shorelines and the importance of cod to settlement and the economy of the Province.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North
@MitchelmoreMHA

Gorgeous Goose Cove Embodies Our Heritage, Quintessentially Rural Newfoundland

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If you have make the trek up the Great Northern Peninsula and did not have the pleasure of visiting Goose Cove East than you are truly missing out on what is quintessentially representative of rural Newfoundland living. This vibrant fishing town is snuggled around the rugged harbour as homes hug the shoreline.

 

An expanse of walking trails take you to berry patches, gazebos and the ocean with views of whales, fishing boats and of course icebergs (below is a super size one from 2011). The walks are like a living fairy tale! 

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All around Goose Cove is rural living, from the clothes hanging on the line, vegetable gardens, small scale farms, wood piles, root cellars and vernacular architecture. The church and community hall are the prominent public buildings, with a day park for recreational use.

The fishery is ever present with boats, fishing rooms, wharves, stages and continues to be the driver of the local economy. Storm damage has resulted in the loss of some of the traditional wharves and stages, such as the Simmonds wharf, which was crushed (depicted in photo gallery above by blue fishing boat). Work must continue to preserve and protect our traditional structures and our inshore fishery. Despite the daunting elements Goose Cove residents are proud of the place they call home. Incredible talented musicians and storytellers have grown-up or connected to this community. They keep passing on their traditions, telling their stories and singing their songs about home. They are quite fortunate of the beauty and all the things and people that make this place home!

Goose Cove is gorgeous, and is a must see as you experience all the Great Northern Peninsula has to offer.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North
@MitchelmoreMHA

 

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