Blog Archives

Needing Grandma’s Green Thumb to Grow Tomatoes

My grandparents have always maintained two large gardens between our house and theirs. At this time of year as a little boy, I was quite eager to help in the garden. Maybe some of the excitement stemmed from the fact that I spent all day in the mud and the work felt more like play; it could have been that tracking around mud got on my mother’s nerves or maybe just spending time with my grandmother, grandfather and other relatives was full of enjoyment.

The garden provides our family with enough potato to last the season. As well, an abundance of turnip, carrot, greens, radishes, cabbage and onions. Additionally, my grandmother has a strawberry patch she maintains and a beautiful flower garden.

I only hope to have some of her green thumb, as I am trying to grow tomatoes, peppers, asparagus, green onion and other vegetables I enjoy, but at times are difficult to obtain or costly to purchase. The project will lead to a greenhouse to transplant and nurture these vegetables.

Growing Tomatoes

A visit to the grocery store this week set off an alarm that food prices are certainly climbing at an alarming rate. Three tomatoes were priced at nearly $5.00, brocoli was $4.00 and there was no asparagus. Food prices and food security has become an increasing issue, especially for rural regions. In the past, we were able to subsist of food we grew on our own. Although there are gardens at roadside, far more people are opting to buy from the California Farmers or elsewhere than from our own backyards.

 
We should reclaim the land that can grow us an abundance of nutritious food, construct greenhouses and build community gardens as a means to combat soaring food prices. In co-operation, rural communities can grow stronger!
 
I hope my little crop produces some good results!
 
Live Rural NL
Christopher C. Mitchelmore

 

Opportunity to Hook: Mat/Rug Hooking Training

Grenfell Hooked Rugs

Dr. Wilfred Grenfell, founder of the International Grenfell Mission supported economic development on the Great Northern Peninsula and Labrador. He organized co-ops, especially for local women to help supplement fishing or other incomes from spouses. A visit to Grenfell Historic Properties this summer outlined a quote of the Doctor, asking people to “send your stockings to Labrador”. The women would then take the silks and use them to produce mats or rugs to sale. Some residents today continue with this tradition  and realize an opportunity to preserve tradition, generate revenues and expand your skills.

The College of the North Atlantic, St. Anthony, is interested in offering part-time evening Mat/Rug classes in the Flower’s Cove area.

They are attempting to determine the level of interest. Sufficient enrolment required in order for classes to commence.

To express an interest or to obtain more information, please contact Joan Kinden at 709 457 2719 or Sabrina Gaulton at 709 456 2834.

This is a great opportunity for residents of this region to learn a unique talent, make product or gifts that is one of a kind to pass on to family, friends or others locally and across the globe.

Live Rural NL – Christopher Mitchelmore

%d bloggers like this: