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Sometimes a Name Does Say It All – Paradise, NL

I have spent more than a year of my life living literally in Paradise. I had moved from 55  1/2 Bell’s Turn in The District of Virginia Waters to Paradise in the fall of 2005 as I continued my studies at Memorial University. I stayed in Paradise until December 2006, when I hopped across the pond and spent the next year of my life in Europe – working, studying, travelling and consuming culture. In 2008, I completed my last semester at Memorial University while living in Paradise, NL in the District of Mount Pearl North.

The Town at the time had a tag line “A Community in Progress”. Although, most likely true – with that type of tagline it was indefinitely selling itself short. I only noticed this sign on my past visit in 2011/12 that the sign illustrated a new brand for the Town.

Welcome to Town of Paradise “Our Name Says It All…”

My area of interest at Memorial was Marketing and I commend the Town of Paradise for capitalizing on its name and selling them in a more grown-up manner with much more to offer residents and visitors.

Although, I no longer live in the Town – I am living in my own Paradise. I am home and have been since 2009.

However, it is important to think about how your Town or Community is being portrayed by residents and travellers. How are you marketing? What are you doing to be placed on the map?

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

Live Rural NL Blogger Seeks NDP Nomination for District of The Straits -White Bay North in Fall Election

Christopher Mitchelmore, a resident of Green Island Cove in the Strait of Belle is vying for the NDP candidacy for the District of The Straits -White Bay North. 

Christopher grew up in this fishing community at a time when his family and fellow residents were faced with an economically devastating moratorium, which would lead to higher levels of unemployment, business closures and out-migration. 

As a teenager he faced his greatest challenge with the sudden death of his father, the late-Clyde Mitchelmore Jr., who passed away on a fishing boat in Nain, Labrador in September 1999. This life changing event would push Christopher to become more involved with academics, extra-curricular and community activities that would help with personal growth.

Mr. Mitchelmore’s first experience in the political arena was in 2002 as a participant of the Forum for Young Canadians in Ottawa, which goal is to foster and promote an understanding among young Canadians of the role and function of Canada ‘s three levels of democratic government.

Christopher started Flower’s Island Museum in 2002 at Nameless Cove. He later expanded to include a gift shop, 9-hole miniature golf course and worked with partners to host an annual summer festival. The business operated until 2005, when Mr. Mitchelmore took a position to aid other youth experience entrepreneurship.

In 2008, Christopher received a Bachelor of Commerce Honours (Co-op) degree and the James Barnes Award for Academic Excellence. His university experience enabled him to work for the Department of Innovation, Trade and Rural Development, NL Board of Commissioners of Public Utilities (Public Utilities Board) and London Offshore Consultants,  study in Europe, work in the United Kingdom and travel 25 countries. These experiences provided insight and valuable networks that will bring new ideas and help encourage business and community economic development in the District.

Since 2009, Christopher has been working for Community Business Development Corporation Nortip as Client Services Officer providing assistance to individuals and groups wishing to start-up, expand or modernize a small-medium business or social enterprise.

Additionally, Christopher has been involved with a number of organizations and served on several committees, including:

The NDP has long been a party that has advocated social democratic policies that support working people, families and the labor movement.  It is a party that works on behalf of the people and has put government to task as a strong opposition party. Recently, the Provincial Government sided with the NDP which will remove the Provincial portion of the HST from Home Heating this coming Fall.

“The region needs a stronger voice, one that will stand up for the people and address the everyday concerns of the region. The Great Northern Peninsula is faced with fishery woes, erosion of local services, inadequate telecommunication (broadband and cellular) services in areas,  plight of our youth and a long list of other challenges that affect the well-being of the individuals and families living in the region.”

Christopher Mitchelmore would be an energetic and educated NDP candidate of The Straits-White Bay North, bringing a new vision and your voice to the House of Assembly. 

Make your vote count this upcoming election. Vote for a party that has fresh ideas and real solutions. Let’s pave the way for new growth and prosperity in The Straits – White Bay North.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

News Release: The French Shore Historical Society To Launch The Centre For Textile Art

More developments in Conche, NL according to News Release:

P.O. Box 29, Conche, NL  A0K 1Y0

Tele:  709-622-3500   Fax:  709-622-3510

E-mail:  frenchshorehs@nf.aibn.com

 

For Immediate Release             Contact:  Joan Simmonds/Colleen McLean 709-622-3500

THE FRENCH SHORE HISTORICAL SOCIETY TO LAUNCH

THE CENTRE FOR TEXTILE ART

CONCHE, NL    ———-     On July 26, 2011 the French Shore Historical Society will officially open a Centre for Textile Art.  The purpose of the Centre will be to encourage the art of handmade textile crafts and to promote the art and history of textile-based traditions, especially of the Northern Peninsula. The Centre will focus on the historical textile development of northern Newfoundland by acquiring, preserving and making accessible a research collection of textiles and relevant documents. It will sponsor exhibitions, conferences, symposia, oral history projects, publications, fellowships and grant funded initiatives.

Since its founding in 2000, the French Shore Historical Society has showcased textile work by craftspeople in the region, including exhibitions of hooked rugs, knitting, embroidery, and included textile objects in its permanent exhibit. It has sponsored several workshops on textile art and in 2009 added the unique French Shore Tapestry, embroidered by women from Conche, as a major part of its exhibit.

In 2010, as a foundation for developing the centre, a research project was undertaken by the French Shore Historical Society in partnership with the Port au Choix – St. Anthony Regional Council of the Rural Secretariat.  The purpose of the research was to document the traditional craft skills on the Great Northern Peninsula, with particular attention to crafts using or creating textiles. An inventory of the research, done by Memorial University student Lisa Wilson, can be accessed by visiting the MUN Digital Archives Initiatives. 

In the Fall of 2010 a steering committee was created and consists of:

Anne Manual – Craft Council of Newfoundland and Labrador

Barb Hunt- Grenfell Campus, Corner Brook

Brenda Stratton – Dept. of Innovation, Trade and Rural Development

Candace Cochrane – Quebec Labrador Foundation

Denise White – Dept. of Innovation, Trade and Rural Development

Gerry Pocius – Memorial University of Newfoundland

Joan Simmonds – French Shore Historical Society

Lisa Wilson – MUN Research Student

Nina Mitchelmore – Regional Planner for Rural Secretariat

Susan Furneaux – College of the North Atlantic

The French Shore Historical Society is a non-profit organization founded to preserve  the natural and cultural heritage of the communities of Conche , Croque, Grand Oies/St. Julien’s and Main Brook on the Northeast coast of Newfoundland.   The FSHS has successfully managed many projects which have created great economic benefits, employment opportunities, and great tourism potential on the Great Northern Peninsula.

The Opening will be a Basket Weaving Workshop with Helga Gillard .  Funding was provided by the International Grenfell Association through fundraising efforts of the French Shore Historical Society.

 

      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Encourage Youth to Make Their Own Money…

I remember one of my first endeavours into business. We were roadside retailers/re-sellers of items we purchased at a local convenience store. Two friends a couple of houses away and I purchased candy, potato chips, gum and Neilson Chunk chocolates and re-packaged the items into brown paper bags. We creatively called our product goodie bags, as the “surprise bag” was already taken. We sold them for $0.50/per bag. I am unsure if we made money on this product or if the customers felt they received good value for their money. We also sold some chalk painted rocks and other handmade crafts. I remember they were not big sellers though. Local residents from our rural community supported our first venture into the world of business. In the early 1990’s, there appeared to be more value placed on being creative, taking initiative and  incentive to earn a few dollars to buy things we wanted. I know at the youthful age, we most likely re-invested it on more sugary good stuff :).

As I grew older,  my progression in business included packing up firewood, painting fences, mowing lawns, doing chores or odd jobs, washing cars, tutoring to selling homemade crafts. My parents encouraged me to work hard, realize there is a cost of material goods and to understand the value of money.

At 16 years of age, I founded Flower’s Island Museum. The business expanded to include a 9-hole miniature golf course and later a summer festival, which operated for two years in partnership with another youth entrepreneur. During 2002, I contacted Nortip Development Corporation seeking information on heritage grants and spoke with the Youth Development Officer. Although, I did not apply or receive grant funding, I was introduced to a program they offered called Youth Ventures.

Youth Ventures empowers students age 12-29 start and operate their own businesses in Newfoundland & Labrador. There are 23 Youth Ventures Coordinators throughout the province to provide free assistance to interested youth. You can visit www.youthventuresnl.com. They have a list of ideas, information and contact information for a local coordinator.

Youth Ventures helped raise the profile of my business. I was profiled by the Getting the Message Out (GMO) program with the Department of Innovation, Trade and Rural Development. During my Bachelor of Commerce studies at Memorial University, I became employed as an intern with GMO. As well, received a number of local and provincial honors, which included the Provincial High Achievement of Financial Management Award sponsored by the Royal Bank of Canada. Operating my own business provided a wealth of experiences, included customer service, marketing, financial management, human resources and operations. I enjoyed adapting to new situations and engaging in constant improvement. This experience aided in landing a position with an International Marine & Engineering Consultancy Headquartered in London, England.

There is satisfaction in creating, assisting and meeting the needs of the consumer. Youth in Rural Newfoundland & Labrador have opportunities to make their own money and put their talents to good use by venturing into the wonderful world of business. However, without incentive to do so, we may lose a future generation of innovators and economic drivers. In some rural communities it appears adherent today that youth no longer need to work to earn an allowance. Additionally, many are given mobile phones starting at elementary school, not to mention parents purchasing all sorts of electronics, brand name clothing, lavish recreational vehicles and cars as presents.

Youth need to be encouraged, understand the importance of the almighty dollar and to make decisions with their own money.  The future can be bright for rural Newfoundland & Labrador for young leaders today and tomorrow, if we provide the necessary supports.

Encourage youth to make their own money…create their own dream job, be their own boss and masters of their own destiny.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

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