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Enchanting Englee on a November’s Day

Englee has made the news over the past year on many occasions, but not for its natural beauty but for the eyesore and environmental hazard of the fish plant falling into the harbour. The plant has now been removed,  site re-mediated and boasts a beautiful view of the harbour. This marks the end of era, as the plant was one of the province’s oldest fresh fish processing plants in the province. We must continue to build on the heritage of fishery, as it exists in and around every nook and cranny of this province.

Englee is at the end of Route 433, which was built around an abundant fishing resource. Some residents of re-settled Great Harbour Deep, Williamsport and Hooping Harbour.  There is a real opportunity to capitalize on the heritage, as there is an established Heritage Home and much research undertaken of events and oral history compiled of local residents.

I encourage visitors to take the trek from Route 430 onto Route 432 (Grenfell Drive or cross-country road) and then to Route 433. You will not be disappointed with the views of fishing stages, rooms, individually built wharves, saltbox houses and other pieces of vernacular architecture. Drop by one of the three convenience stores or Cross Rocks Cafe to have a yarn. Walk the trails, look-outs and shore lines. Even on a warm November’s day, Englee is enchanting.

Enjoy island hopping as you explore!

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

 

 

Treat Abandoned Englee Plant like the Emergency it is: Mitchelmore

Taken January 26, 2012

NDP Fisheries Critic Christopher Mitchelmore (The Straits-White Bay North) is demanding the provincial government deal with the decaying former fishplant in Englee before something tragic happens in the Northern Peninsula community.

“The Provincial Government has failed to commit to the clean-up of the abandoned Englee fish plant, for which it is ultimately responsible,” said Mitchelmore. “On January 26, the roof of the structure collapsed. This was nearly eight years after the company that had been operating the plant abandoned it. Community representatives have been calling for the plant’s removal ever since, but government is apparently ignoring them.

“It is obvious to me this Government does not have a plan to deal with crisis situations” says Mitchelmore. “This dangerous situation in Englee could have been prevented and should be a lesson for this Government. Nobody was hurt this time, but there’s no guarantee about what will happen next time a portion of that plant falls down.”

Mitchelmore says the situation in Englee should be raising alarm bells in every community in the province with a fishplant. “What will stop Ocean Choice International, for example, from similarly walking away from communities in which it currently does business – or from plants it has closed?” Mitchelmore asked. “The Province must enact legislation to hold companies accountable, especially fish processers that are benefiting from the people’s resource.

“It is time to give communities control over their resources, entering into a royalty agreement with a processor,” he said. “If Government continues to give away our fishery to irresponsible processors, any town in Newfoundland and Labrador could be facing a crisis similar to the one in Englee.”

http://www.nl.ndp.ca/nr012712EngleePlantHazard

Mitchelmore questions future of Marystown facility

For Immediate Release –

Thursday, January 19, 2012

NDP Fisheries critic Christopher Mitchelmore (MHA, The Straits – White Bay North) says he is concerned the people of the province will be left on the hook for any clean-up of the closed Marystown fish plant facility.

Ocean Choice International ― the current owner of the facility ― has made it clear they will not be processing any more fish there, and will be selling the facility.

Mitchelmore says his fear is the company will gut the facility of valuable equipment and then try to walk away from the site. He says government must ensure the people it will hold OCI accountable for all the company’s responsibilities regarding the facility.

“The people of Englee, in my district, know all too well what happens when the owner of a fish plant isn’t held to its responsibilities for the site after the enterprise closes,” says Mitchelmore. “They know government will do nothing to help them.

“I’d hate to see the people of Marystown, and the people of this province, stuck with another expensive, and possibly dangerous environmental clean-up like the former paper mill in Grand Falls-Windsor and, of course, the disintegrating plant in Englee that is causing so much hardship and worry.”

Disintegrating Englee Fish Plant
Live Rural NL –
Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

Grandmother Mitchelmore….How does your garden grow?

Planted beds of small seed in Grandma's Garden

My Grandmother Mitchelmore has been planting a garden for a lifetime. At 79 years young she knows that around the end of May, there is a flurry of activity to attend to the ground. She plants potatoes, turnip, carrot, onions and cabbage to ensure that she can prepare her traditional Jigg’s Dinner throughout the year. She also maintains a strawberry patch, which at times I am tempted to raid.

I grew up helping my grandparents in the garden and always enjoyed the harvest. I remember Grandmother and I were digging all the potatoes and she got a supersize tater. I dug frantically trying to match her giant spud. I did dig up a larger potato, but it definitely would not win a beauty contest.

Today she helped me continue to attempts to grow a variety of vegetables locally. We planted onion, red onion, green onion and baby carrots. Tomorrow, I will plant lettuce plants in addition to my already planted tomatoes, green peppers, red peppers and asparagus.

Grandmother planting onions with me today

There seems to have been a generational gap among those of my parents age, as many did not adapt the skills required to maintain a garden. However, there is hope as younger generations appear to have a strong interest in growing vegetables. Rural communities have an opportunity to utilize this interest as a means to share space and offer community gardens. Experienced elders can teach those younger the necessary skills to have a successful growing season.

Get your garden growing this season. It is not to late to start on the Great Northern Peninsula.

Live Rural NL

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

Needing Grandma’s Green Thumb to Grow Tomatoes

My grandparents have always maintained two large gardens between our house and theirs. At this time of year as a little boy, I was quite eager to help in the garden. Maybe some of the excitement stemmed from the fact that I spent all day in the mud and the work felt more like play; it could have been that tracking around mud got on my mother’s nerves or maybe just spending time with my grandmother, grandfather and other relatives was full of enjoyment.

The garden provides our family with enough potato to last the season. As well, an abundance of turnip, carrot, greens, radishes, cabbage and onions. Additionally, my grandmother has a strawberry patch she maintains and a beautiful flower garden.

I only hope to have some of her green thumb, as I am trying to grow tomatoes, peppers, asparagus, green onion and other vegetables I enjoy, but at times are difficult to obtain or costly to purchase. The project will lead to a greenhouse to transplant and nurture these vegetables.

Growing Tomatoes

A visit to the grocery store this week set off an alarm that food prices are certainly climbing at an alarming rate. Three tomatoes were priced at nearly $5.00, brocoli was $4.00 and there was no asparagus. Food prices and food security has become an increasing issue, especially for rural regions. In the past, we were able to subsist of food we grew on our own. Although there are gardens at roadside, far more people are opting to buy from the California Farmers or elsewhere than from our own backyards.

 
We should reclaim the land that can grow us an abundance of nutritious food, construct greenhouses and build community gardens as a means to combat soaring food prices. In co-operation, rural communities can grow stronger!
 
I hope my little crop produces some good results!
 
Live Rural NL
Christopher C. Mitchelmore

 

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