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Advisory: Mitchelmore to visit South Coast

For immediate release

July 13, 2012

 

Advisory: Mitchelmore to visit South Coast

 

NDP Fisheries Critic Christopher Mitchelmore (MHA, The Straits-White Bay North) takes his Orange Tent Tour to the south coast of the province for a couple of days next week.

 

Mitchelmore looks forward to speaking with people involved in both the traditional fishery and aquaculture. In St. Alban’s, he will meet with the Executive Director of the Newfoundland and Labrador Aquaculture Industry Association, and with the Business Development Agency. He also plans to visit the Centre for Aquaculture Health and Development in that community.  

 

The MHA hopes to get answers to some questions he has about the current infectious salmon anemia outbreak in the area – in particular, why the diseased fish have not already been taken out of the water to prevent a further spread of the virus to both other aquaculture sites and wild fish, and whether contingency plans to do so are in effect at other aquaculture enterprises.

 

To locate or contact Mitchelmore on his travels, people can follow #orangetenttour on Twitter.

 

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Moose Antlers Make Quite the Entrance – Englee, NL

On a recent trip to Englee, NL my attention was drawn to the house below that had a very beautifully landscaped yard, fountain with Moose Antlers combined to make quite the entrance.

I am proud to see this unique creation by a local artist. It is great to see creative uses for a product that most people would just throw away. Moose are in abundance on the Great Northern Peninsula. Males shed their antlers each season to conserve energy, as well their antlers can be obtained during Moose Hunting season in Fall/early Winter.

There is value in producing unique products. I have seen antlers used to form a large chandelier at the Tuckamore Lodge, Main Brook. There are also a select few with the talents to tediously carve from the moose antler.

This past weekend, my two friends showed me a unique product made from a wooden tree with deer antlers – a Coat Tree.

We have an opportunity to produce unique products made from moose antlers. We can develop a cottage industry around them and make high-end coat trees, chandeliers, entrance posts, and others. We have talented people in our rural economies that could produce during the Fall/Winter these products from sale on-line or at local gift shops.

There are simple solutions that can help our rural communities survive and thrive. With the appropriate partnerships and involvement by stakeholders we can change the state of our economy.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

Twitter/LiveRuralNL

The Roving Newfoundlanders

Newfoundlanders & Labradorian’s continue to roam the world, passing on talents, exploring and making history. I’ve been reading Old-Time Songs and Poetry of Newfoundland: Songs of the People from the Days of our Forefathers. Compiler and Publisher, Gerald S. Doyle (1892-1956) was one of Newfoundland’s most successful businessman, establishing a province-wide pharmaceutical and home products business. Additionally, he had a passion for preserving culture. His newspaper, “The Family Fireside” was provincially distributed, provided good advice and noted first-hand accounts about the social and economic conditions of rural communities, as well as promoted his products. He certainly was a very savvy businessman. He has done us all a remarkable service through his publications. We now have preserved in time these songbooks for us to enjoy, reflect and compare with current Newfoundland folk songs.

Newfoundlanders  are known for being musical and having our own unique folk songs. Today, I will share with you “The Roving Newfoundlanders” taken from Ballads and Sea Songs of Newfoundland

The Roving Newfoundlander

  • As I was setting in my homestead on day
  •          while all alone,
  • I was thinking of my countrymen and
  •         where they had to roam,
  • From England to America, Australia and
  •        Japan
  • Where’er you go you’ll surely find a man
  •        from Newfoundland.
  • They’re the pride of every country, good
  •        fortune on the smile!
  • They climbed the heights of Alma, and
  •        crossed the river Nile,
  • They sailed unto Vancouver, you’ll find it on
  •        the roll,
  • And on the expedition went nearest to
  •       the Pole.
  •  
  • It’s way out in South Africa where hogs
  •       they stand so high,
  • They used their guns and bayonets the
  •       Boers for to destroy,
  • Where cannons roar like thunder
  •       destructions on the plain
  • You sons of Terra Nova, you fought for
  •       England’s fame.
  •  
  • ‘was Nelson at Trafalgar the victory
  •        did gain,
  • The Americans fought the Spaniards for
  •        blowing up the Maine;
  • She sunk with all of her gallent crew,
  •       that gay and gallant band,
  • They’re sleeping in their watery graves like
  •       sons of Newfoundland.
  •  
  • When my mind been bent on roaming, ’tis
  •       something sad to tell
  • Out in the mines of Cuba one of my
  •      comrades fell.
  • His age had scarce been twenty-one, just
  •      entered in full bloom,
  • On the eighteenth day of June was
  •      summoned to his tomb.
  •  
  • They sailed the Mediterranean, I’ve heard
  •       the clergy tell,
  • They went out into Egypt, from that to
  •       Jacob’s Well,
  • They’ve fished the Northern and Grand
  •       Banks from every hole and knap,
  • They are the tyrants of the sea, they
  •       fished the Flemish Cap.
  •  
  • And now my song is ended, I think I have
  •       done well,
  • My birthplace and my station I’m trying
  •      for to tell.
  • I’ve spoken of every nation, I’ve freely won
  •      my race,
  • I am a Newfoundlander belongs to
  •      Harbour Grace.

My grandfather at 80 years, passed away this June. He had a remarkable memory and ability to rhyme off anecdotes, jokes, stories, poems and other lines from days gone by. I only wish we had greater written accounts of all his knowledge and tales. He is sadly missed. So take time and write down that traditional song, story or event, it can help us preserve our Newfoundland & Labrador culture as  we continue to advance in society. In the early 1900’s we may have been required to own a newspaper company to reach the mass of a province; however, today we have social media such as Facebook, Twitter, Blogs and others to reach the world.

Live Rural Newfoundland –

CCM

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