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It’s never to early to start planning your Winter vacation on the GNP

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1311172644-1The Great Northern Peninsula has one of the longest winter seasons on the Island portion of the province of Newfoundland & Labrador. We are the ideal location for an array of winter activities and enjoy the scenery as you experience the countryside, view the frozen Strait of Belle Isle with Labrador as the backdrop or snowmobile on our most Northerly section of the remaining Appalachian mountains.

There is a number of trail networks for cross-country ski-ing or snow-shoeing, as well as the opportunity for the adventurous type to visit alternative locations.

You can enjoy ice-fishing activities, pond skating or a good ol’ hockey game that really immerse you in all the fun and enjoyment winter brings to the people of the North. We embrace winter activities and have a love for spending time in the great outdoors, whether it be at the cabin with a crackling fire, game of cards and a cup of tea or at home with the family building a snowman and making those snow angels we all did when we were kids.

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It certainly is never too early to begin your plan to enjoy all the Great Northern Peninsula has to offer.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

Does Anyone Know the Story behind this Snowmobile?

A miniature replica of an old snowmobile was displayed on the yard in the Town of St. Lunaire-Griquet while I was searching for the Petermann Ice Island! I passed by this item, but was told to take a snap.

Does anyone know the history behind this piece of art?

Live Rural NL

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

Twitter/LiveRuralNL

 

Winter road to Roddickton-Bide Arm

Road to Roddickton-Bide Arm

 
The Town of Roddickton-Bide Arm is nestled on the North Eastern part of the Great Northern Peninsula and is an untapped location for winter tourism. The abundance of snow, trees, wildlife, mountains and sunshine makes for a picturesque day.  
 
One should take the opportunity to visit the Town  – take a walk, snowshoe, ski or snowmobile on some of the trails. If you are hungry, stop by the Lumberjack’s Landing or Mayflower Inn for some local grub. You can even stay at the Mayflower for a night or two.  
 
Roddickton has been coined the Moose Capital of the World. On my last two visits I have seen moose. During my last trip on March 24, 2011, I saw two caribou crossing the road. I slowed down, pulled out my camera – but they had disappeared into the forest.   
 

The view from above

 One simply can not be disappointed by the mountains in the background that are snow-covered. You may opt to take a side trip to the Town of Conche just 28 kms away.
 
It is now April 11, 2011 and there is still an abundance of snow and great snowmobiling on the hills. There is still an opportunity for those who wish to enjoy the scenic beauty of the what the Great Northern Peninsula has to offer this season. If you are not able, mark your calendars for the 2012 season!
 
Live Rural NL 0
Christopher Mitchelmore

Great-Great-Grandmother, 90-years Traps Bear

Each community has a character or iconic individual that is memorable or does something out of the extraordinary. For the Town of Hawke’s Bay on the Northern Peninsula that person is 90-year-old Great-Great Grandmother, Cecilia (“Celie”) Smith.

Over a pot of rabbit stew today at dinner, the conversation between my great-aunt, great-uncle and grandmother turned to bear sightings. I had mentioned to my uncle that while on vacation travelling to Conche (the French Shore) I saw a small cub near roadside. Then travelling on the Trans Canada Highway later in the week I saw another black bear. I have lived in rural NL for nearly 20 years and have never seen a bear until this summer. This re-called a recent article in the Northern Pen, Western Star and Telegram newspapers with the title, “90-year old bags bear”.

This is not the first bear for this spry woman. I recall back in 2007 watching an episode of CBC’s Land & Sea, which profiled her at 87 & 88 years of age having trapped at least two previously (Celie’s story can be viewed at: http://www.cbc.ca/landandsea/2009/04/celies-story.html). This woman built her own home, a home for her parents and others, provided maintenance and worked 32 years at the Maynard’s Motor Inn, worked as a fisherperson and logger. She still maintains a large garden, does woodwork and other daunting tasks that most people my age and younger wouldn’t tackle, yet at 90, she makes it look easy.

She has a real love for the great outdoors,  the forest (woods) and at her cabin, which she built. She enjoys rabbit snaring and does so on her own snowmobile, accompanied by her great-grandson. To me she is one pretty cool great-grandmother. Even today she continues to beaver trap with her son and continues to hold a bear hunting licence.

Celie Smith has the right attitude about many things including:

  1. Trapping or growing her own food instead of eating products at the grocery store with ingredients we can’t even pronounce
  2. Staying active and getting fresh air
  3. Keeping a good sense of humour
  4. Having that one drink of whiskey at night

I remember a book given to me by an elementary school teacher, called The Legend of Princess Sheila NaGeira, which I read 15 years ago. The book left an impression on me because I remember she lived to be 105 years old according to the Legend and that she lived by the philosophy that “it is better to wear out, than to rust out.” So let’s take a page out of  Celie Smith’s book, get outside and enjoy rural living.

Slowly Sipping Whiskey –

CCM

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