Caribou Crossing – Viking Trail (Route 430) Great Northern Peninsula

A caribou herd had decided to establish a crossing on the Viking Trail. My European friend’s were treated to another experience with nature on the Great Northern Peninsula.

The caribou were crossing in two separate lines. The car driving south is also getting a closer view of the majestic animal that is a relative of the reindeer.

Watch this young caribou jump into the shrubbery at roadside.

It is not uncommon to see a small herd of caribou when visiting the Great Northern Peninsula. Our Moose sighting at this point was nil. In fact, I have not seen a moose in the District of the Straits-White Bay North alive since late night July 2011. I did encounter a moose during the campaign in the St. Barbe area back in September. There is a growing concern on the Great Northern Peninsula that the moose population is in severe decline.

Live Rural NL -

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North
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About Live Rural NL

I am a youth living in rural Newfoundland & Labrador that will share stories of culture, tradition, heritage, business, travel, geography and other posts relating to any rural. I completed a Bachelor of Commerce Hons. (Coop) degree from Memorial University of Newfoundland & Labrador. I currently live and work on the Great Northern Peninsula, where I was born and raised. However, I have lived and worked internationally and travelled to more than 30 countries around the globe. On October 11, 2011 I was elected the youngest Member to Represent the people of the Straits -White Bay North in the Provincial Legislature of Newfoundland & Labrador.

Posted on January 19, 2012, in Landscapes/Geography, Vacations and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Thank you Christopher, you are correct, our moose is going the same way as the Cod, not enough are speaking up for the moose. Without them in my Industry we will loose a number of jobs, the problem is with the long season and to many female and calves are being killed. No replacement animals, you can’t sustain a herd without that being included into the formula.
    People are driving to fast on the Avalon, so why don’t they manage the herd on the Avalon or remove them as close as possible. We have had an enormous increase in licenses because of the Avalon screaming to get the population down. Cull where the problem is don’t create a problem in other places which we see happening here now. We had lots of moose (only 2 deaths in the 36 years I have lived here-you got to respect your environment) but in the end we will have nothing, Cod was managed from St. John’s, Moose managed from St. John’s, Same results and you can’t protect Nothing. It is devastating for our companies and our communities. Nobody here wants to see the Moose go the way of the wolf.

  2. Thank you for bringing this issue to the public. Last year prior to the 2011 moose licences being issued, I sent letters to the Premier and the Minister of Environment and Conservation telling them about the grave concerns I had over the high number of licences issued in our area. I asked for a reduction in the quota and stated my reasons for asking. Local people depend on the meat for food. This is what 1 moose equals to our economy more than 700 jobs, $377.55 for a licence, HST amounts up to $800.00 for a hunting package, Airline fare average $900.00, or gas when driving Hotel accommodations for 8 to 10 days, wages for a cook, cleaning staff, guides, taxi drivers who pick up guest at Airports, employment for office and administration staff, a person who retrieves the meat from the field. Freight cost for the airlines or trucking companies who ship the meat, a large moose cut and packaged at the butcher shop pays the wages for a person for a week, 1 moose trophy prepared at the Taxidermist pays the wages for 1 person for a week or more, packaging for meat shipment employs local people. Hunting guest buy meals at restaurants while travelling, souveniers at the shops and pay to do Eco tours with sightseeing companies after the hunt is completed. Many guest bring non-hunting companions, increasing the revenue. Any hunter who don’t need all of the meat harvested donates it to local people.European hunters who are not allowed to take meat home donate 4 quarters. We have a list of people who call requesting meat, we donate to single parent families, low income families, seniors and handicapped. Once this list is completed we donate to other people from the list. Nothing is wasted.
    We have great respect for the animal and have a policy when you shoot , dead or wounded the animal is yours and the hunt is over, so make sure before you shoot.
    Please support our concerns, speak up for a reduction in licences in area 1, 45 and 40.
    Thank you,
    Celie Parsons

  1. Pingback: A Feed of Moose Meat in the Woods « Live Rural Newfoundland & Labrador

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