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Iceberg Festival kicks off with a “rumble and a roar”

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The 7th Annual Iceberg Festival kicked off its 7th season this year to a room filled with energy and excitement as the icebergs surrounded the tip of the Great Northern Peninsula. Lavinia Crisby was the emcee and set the stage for laughter, fun and engagement with her ability to connect with people over the course of the event. I had the opportunity to speak with those travelling from Germany, Nova Scotia, Alberta, Florida and other parts of world as they gathered to celebrate the pristine beauty of the iceberg – which has been 10,000 years in the making.

The local Tim Horton’s in St. Anthony produces exclusively the World’s only “Iceberg” donut. The region is known for its iceberg water, iceberg ice and the Richard’s family of St. Carol’s who has been famously coined the Iceberg Hunters with their own series played on the USA Weather Network.

Local crab from St. Anthony seafoods was cooked and given away to sample – this was absolutely the freshest means to get such a product already cooked for those visiting, from local fisher to local processor to consumer. Many local restaurants sell local fish products, including our locally grown mussels.

One could watch sculptor Shawn Rumbolt carve an image from an iceberg with a chainsaw. Learn to paint an iceberg with artist George Bussey on a rock and have a souvenir to takeaway and of course enjoy the traditional music of Calvin Blake, Adam Randell and Brandon White this year known as “The Growlers”. Many were on hand to try to name some noise using the Newfoundland ugly stick, share in a scuff or two across the floor and join in singing a known song.

We were treated to Calvin Blake’s Iceberg song once more and like his words a rumble and a roar – the opening was just that, clearly a must attend event. There are still several days before the Iceberg Festival this year ends, but its never too early to begin planning for June 2016! Visit: www.theicebergfestival.ca for more information. A special thank you to all involved, especially the organizing committee for making it all possible.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-White Bay North)

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An incredible view at Farewell…

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A beautiful view at Farewell waiting for the ferry to the cultural communities at Change Islands and Fogo Island.

The fishing industry dominates the coastline of our many rural communities, highlighting the importance, the reason we have existed on this Rock for more than 500 years.

The crab pots, their design and the people who work them are all part of our rural experience in Newfoundland & Labrador, whether Fogo Island, Carbonear or the Great Northern Peninsula – your authentic rural experiences await!

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-White Bay North)

Fresh Newfoundland Crab Meat is a Delicacy

 

This is the season for Newfoundland & Labrador crab meat. It is such a delicacy.

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The taste of freshly cooked crab legs leaves you wanting more. I enjoy making a crab meat sandwich, it makes a great lunch. One can also enjoy some lovely crab cakes at the Daily Catch in St. Lunaire-Griquet, en route to L’Anse aux Meadows.

Live Rural NL –
 
Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

 

The Beauty of it All – when you do not rush

 
Lar’s Place, Conche, NL
 On February 12, 2011, I visited Conche, NL. It truly is one of the wonders along the French Shore. In my 25 years, I have never taken the time to visit this breath-taking Town outside of the summer season. It was long over due and certainly did not disappoint.

Dock w/Store house and iceflow

 Snow patches were present on the rolling hills and the harbour filled with ice, as I drove the winding roads. For the first time, I was not in any rush to get somewhere or meet someone – it was just perfect. I had taken time to explore the landscape, the houses and just get lost in the wonder that is quintessentially rural Newfoundland & Labrador.

Frontage of Lar's Place

 
I was taken aback by the brightly coloured fishing rooms, stores, stages and sheds that were bountiful along the harbour. It spoke the importance the fishery has played on this small Town throughout its rich and vibrant history. I stopped and took several photos of Lar’s Place (depicted in the photo above). The well maintained property had a mis-matched set of antlers tacked on the front. One half of the antlers boasting a much larger size than its counterpart, if that makes any sense at all. It was of interest, so I stopped for a little while. The weather vane was something I do not re-call ever seeing in any of my home communities in the Strait of Belle Isle. The door had a wooden cross, which was painted white and placed on the door, as well as, a perfectly cut island of Newfoundland to match. Conche has notable folk art, something I did not realize on other visits – from the crabs on outer buildings to cut-outs of birds on store roofs that from a far looked strikingly real.

Crab folk art on outbuilding, Conche, NL

 
My advice is to take some time to truly stop and smell the fresh air and all the hodgepodge that makes rural Newfoundland & Labrador a lifestyle. In a world of rush and go, we often miss the beauty that truly exists in our own backyards.
 
Live Rural NL –
Christopher C. Mitchelmore 
 
 

 

 

 

Increases in 2011 NL Crab Price are long overdue

I just tuned in to the NTV First Edition only to hear FFAW President, Earle McCurdy present some good news for fishers.

It was pretty exciting to hear that the crab processors and the Union were able to agree upon a price of $2.15 per pound to start the 2011 season. This represents an 80 cent per pound increase from last year, which was set by a pricing panel at $1.35 per pound and resulted in much dispute among fishers and processors, with both sides still at odds.

The crab season is set to open next week. It may be the first year in many that it starts without delay. This significant increase will allow fishers to earn more revenue. This will  help offset additional operating costs and also take care of some short-term debts that have accumulated due to increased operating costs, coupled with lower prices and a shortened season.

This is a good sign for the rural economy, as more dollars can be spent and re-invested locally. Let us all hope that this is an indication for prices in other fish species and that 2011 can be a banner year, where the value of fish landings will exceed $1 Billion for the provincial economy.

Here on the Great Northern Peninsula, the fishery remains the backbone of our economy. More attention is needed to ensure future success. It is important to remember that we are all stakeholders of this valuable resource. More control of the resource should be managed at a more localized-level, instead of managed by large corporations, concerned more about their profit, shipping product from the peninsula and less about the human and community economic element.

Live Rural NL 0

Christopher Mitchelmore

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