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Tantalizing Traditions Served at Burnt Cape Cafe – Raleigh, NL

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The Burnt Cape Cafe is a wonderful place to dine on traditional seafood dishes, moose meals and berry desserts. Situated in historic Raleigh this business offers an appealing space, with beautiful waterfront views, while listening to the music by local Quirpon native Wayne Bartlett.

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This season moose has made the menu, including soup, burgers and cheese steak sandwiches. I ordered the moose soup to start and it surely was a welcome treat, as I’ve not had my grandmother’s version in such a long time. It was a hearty bowl, with chunky vegetables and filled with savouring flavour. A great way to start any meal.

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As a main, I had pan fried cod, steamed broccoli. and Parmesan mashed potatoes with coleslaw. The meal was cooked with care, as the vegetables were perfect, the potatoes are out of this world dreamy and the cod just incredibly fresh as it fell gently with each fork full.

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No meal could be complete without dessert, so I opted for the bakeapple sundae. This was truly a tantalizing treat! Local wildberries add to the gourmet flavouring of what the dining experience at Burnt Cape Cafe offers to its patrons.

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The business, which includes cabins, vacation home, convenience store, gift shop and gas station has a rating of 9.1 from Booking.com which highlights the care and attention to visitors. The owners have put together a nice package to offer an experience to their guests. This may include the walk to the wharf to pick your own lobster for dinner and getting your photo taken for social media to capture the moment.

A Little Free Library has popped up outside their business, where residents and visitors can take a book or leave a book any time of the day. This is a great community economic development concept and initiative that I’d love to see more Little Free Libraries on the Great Northern Peninsula and across Newfoundland & Labrador.

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I enjoy conversations with Ted and Marina, the owners of this small business as they are striving to find new ways to create opportunities in their small Town.

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Keep up your entrepreneurial spirit Ted and Marina! Rural Newfoundland and Labrador certainly needs more small business to thrive!

It’s not too late to make a booking or drop by this gem on the tip of the Great Northern Peninsula. Visit www.burntcape.com/

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-White Bay North)

My Quest for Cod – Just 5 Fish…

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As Eddie Coffey would say, yesterday was a “Grey Foggy Day”. I woke up to a dense fog, thick clouded sky and not a draft a wind. Although, I could hear the little motorboats gradually leave the wharf in my tiny little fishing village of Green Island Cove. As the afternoon approached, it was clear that today was the day to participate in the recreational cod or what in Newfoundland and Labrador is commonly referred to as the food fishery.

A few weeks each summer the Feds designate a time when Newfoundlander’s and Labradorians can take to the water and catch just five fish per person, per day with a maximum of 15 per boat if there are three or more people in each boat. The concept of the food fishery and the heavy regulations are a constant frustration of rural Newfoundlanders and Labradorians.

My father was a commercial fisher. In fact, everyone ancestor down my family line on my father’s side was a fisher, stemming all the way back to Southern England. My father and I would go out fishing post-moratorium (post-1992) for a few weeks each summer to fish a nominal quota allocated to commercial fishers capped at a few thousand pounds per week until the overall quota was caught. Since his passing, my only option to catch my five cod like everyone else, as I’m the only person in my family line that never had the option of becoming a fisherman.

As a politician, I constantly speak with fishers and hear their frustrations with the lack of communication in Ottawa regarding our fishery. I hear how abundant the cod is and how much larger they are and this was solidified yesterday when I took to the water to catch my own five fish.

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There is a sense of belonging each time I’m on the water. It is certainly in my blood to continue to practice our traditional ways of culture, heritage and way of rural living. One of the reasons I left Edmonton to return to Newfoundland was to be close to the water.

We did not go far to catch our cod, just off Green Island – it is the small piece of land in which our community is named. After a little while tugging on the line, we hooked some – in fact, I got a double!

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There were many little fishing boats all around us, including the blowing sound of a whale. The fish were full of herring and caplin. The fish and whale were feasting! It did not take too long to catch our 10 fish, we got 5 a piece and they were some size! I remember jigging with Dad some 17 years ago, but the cod were not as large as these – only a scattered one would the size depicted below.

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Cod fish are larger, more abundant and it appears no one is listening. How can it be that so few nets are being used and commercial cod quotas are being filled in days? It’s beyond time to focus on how Newfoundland and Labrador deals with a return of the cod. Iceland has been quite success with their cod fishery and it continues to evolve.

Up on the wharf we showed our catch, gutted the cod, kept the britches and looked forward to a meal. Until we get change at the Federal level, Newfoundlander’s and Labradorian’s will be forced to take a paltry five fish a day.

Something has to change, because 5 fish does not cut it for a resource that sustained us for more than 500 years.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-White Bay North)

BREAKING: Caplin Rolling in Green Island Cove, NL Today! #caplinroll2015

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It’s not every day the caplin come to shore in my home town of Green Island Cove on the Great Northern Peninsula. It created a lot of buzz, with residents as far as Anchor Point, some 25 KM to the south making the drive to get a feed of fresh caplin. It was awesome to see my Aunt and Uncle there, who are visiting from Edmonton, Alberta. They were saying the last time they saw the caplin rolling, their kids were home and just as excited as those on the beach today!

As I watched my younger cousin rushing to fill his bucket. I remember being a young boy with my father on the beach as the caplin rolled about two decades ago. I worked hard with the dip net to fill a couple of five gallon buckets, rushing just like the boys on the beach today. My great great aunt Lavinia was on the beach too, in her mid-seventies at the time, dad said to me lets help Aunt Lavinia fill her bucket. She always remembered that day and so have I, we talked about it often when I visited. She had a sharp memory, right to her final days – she lived to be 98.

The caplin rolling are good signs! We continue to hear reports of an abundance of cod! #caplinroll2015!

It’s exciting times to be living on the Great Northern Peninsula. Now for a feed of caplin 🙂

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-White Bay North)

Delectable Seafood Dishes served at Lightkeeper’s Cafe, St. Anthony, NL

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The Lightkeeper’s Cafe is perched on the edge of Fishing Point, St. Anthony, NL overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. It is a whale watchers and iceberg hunters paradise as the restaurant has a beautiful view with many glass windows. Lightkeeper’s has been recommended in Where to Eat in Canada year over year and is known for its delectable seafood dishes of chowder, fish cakes and pan or deep fried fish meals.

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The salted fish cakes with scrunchions and pickles were a perfect appetizer, as is the seafood chowder with exceptionally generous portions of fish.

One never goes wrong with deep-fried or pan fried cod. I opted for the halibut dish on this visit (depicted in the gallery below), it was so wonderfully prepared.

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I was impressed to see Ben Poughman of Port au Choix’s art hanging on the wall. I would highly recommend this restaurant when visiting St. Anthony on the Great Northern Peninsula. It has the perfect location, great atmosphere, superb staff and delectable seafood dishes that caters to those craving something authentic and local.

If seafood is not your thing, you can also dine in the only sod hut restaurant in North America, enjoying Viking Dinner Theatre and a Great Viking Feast next door!

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-White Bay North)

Black Duck Cove has a Hidden Gem

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Traveling the Great Northern Peninsula on Route 430 (Viking Trail Highway) en route to L’anse aux Meadows World UNESCO Site or to Quebec or Labrador via the Strait of Belle Isle Ferry crossing, Black Duck Cove presents the perfect stopping point.

The Black Duck Cove Seashore Day Park provides a picnic area, play ground, viewing binoculars, open air museum of Newfoundland vernacular architecture. walking trails, bbq area, miniature golf and basketball courts. It’s a great rest stop to enjoy life by the sea.

The concept of an open air museum is not new, as I’ve visited many on my European travels. I’m impressed that this economic development project is a step back in time of what the small outport community living looked like – from the one room school, church, wharf, hall to homes. These handmade buildings replicate our rural life and are wonderful to view and take a snap or two. This concept could be taken a step further and explain the building process, tell the stories of who owned these homes and the pioneers that built and shaped the community.

This area needs better directional signage to guide you to this almost hidden space. It’s almost a locals know kinda of gem. Since location is less than ideal, this fantastic space needs to be further promoted and expanded upon.

As you take the paved road and drive pass the Black Duck Cove wharf and shrimp plant, you will encounter lobster traps neatly piled, fishing gear and boats sitting on the grass. Our history, our heritage, our culture and life from the sea is well on display – both past and present at Black Duck Cove Seashore Day Park.

It is an experience in itself.

Live Rural NL,

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-White Bay North)

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