Category Archives: Newfoundland Recipes

Our Culinary Treats

In rural Newfoundland & Labrador “Sunday Dinner”, “Hot Dinner”, “Cooked Dinner” and “Boiled Dinner” are common terms used in reference to a meal at noon on Sunday.

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I will share with you how to prepare Sunday’s Dinner, since it is my favorite traditional Newfoundland meal. It is chicken or turkey with stuffing, potatoes, carrots, turnips, greens, cabbage, potatoes, gravy, peas pudding and our famous salt beef. We also have a selection of other puddings that may be served with the meal: bread pudding, raisin pudding (locally referred to as “figgy duff”), molasses pudding, blackberry, partridge berry and there are many others! My grandmother makes the best raisin puddings and molasses puddings. Yum!

SUNDAY DINNER

  • 1 Whole Chicken, Turkey, Moose Roast or other meat product
  • 1 cup yellow split peas
  • 6-8 medium potatoes
  • 6 carrots
  • 1 medium turnip (peel and slice)
  • 1 medium cabbage (cut in wedges)
  • Slices of slightly stale bread
  • Onion
  • Ground Pepper
  • Salt
  • Spices (thyme, basil or rosemary)
  • Butter
  1. Prepare stuffing by soaking slightly stale bread in water. Squeeze to remove excess water. Add melted butter, salt, black pepper and seasoning (basil, rosemary or thyme).
  2. Prepare chicken or meat, lightly salt. Place stuffing inside chicken, excess can be wrapped in foil. In a roasting pan, place chicken and add water. Cook on 350 F, lightly baste and add an onion for flavour.
  3. Soak salt meat overnight, drain and place in large cooking pot. Tie peas in cloth bag (locally referred to as “peas pudding bag”); however, a mason jar with a few holes punched at the top will also be sufficient. Put peas in pot with salt beef. Cover beef and peas with water. Heat to boiling, cover and simmer for 2 hours.
  4. Prepare vegetables. Small carrots and potatoes may be left whole, larger ones are to be cut in half. Slice turnip and cut cabbage into wedges. After meat and peas have cooked for 2-2.5 hours add vegetables and cook until tender, adding the cabbage last.
  5. Remove peas from bag, place in bowl and mash with butter and black pepper to make peas pudding.
  6. Remove salt meat and slice. Remove vegetables and place on platter and serve.

FIGGIE DUFF

  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 2 cups of flour
  • 1 egg
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 cup milk or water
  • 1 cup of raisins
  • Pinch of salt

Combine dry ingredients, add milk and egg. Put in a cloth or spring container and boil for two hours.

MOLASSES PUDDING

  • 1 cup of molasses
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp allspice
  • 1/2 cup hot water
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 3 cups flour

Mix together molasses, sugar and spices in a bowl. Dissolve baking soda in hot water. Add to first mixture, then add melted butter and raisins. Mix well. Add sifted flour a little at a time. Put in greased pudding mould and steam 1 1/2 to 2 hours.

Many great talks or yarns happen around the kitchen table in rural Newfoundland, both in the past and still today.

Hope you enjoy!

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

A Feed of Fish n’ Brewis

Fish & Brewis is a traditional Newfoundland Specialty. I enjoyed this meal of fish, brewis and boiled potatoes on January 5th, 2012.

I’ll share with you the recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 4 Cakes Purity Hard Bread
  • 2 lb salt cod fish
  • 1 cup of salt pork (finely diced)
  • Drawn Butter: 1/4 Cup Butter, 2 Med. Onions (chopped), 2 tbsp Water, 1 Cup Water (Optional)

Soak Hard Bread overnight. Use lots of water. Soak cod-fish in a separate bowl overnight. In the morning change water and cook cod-fish for about 15 minutes. Remove from heat and drain. Put hard bread in saucepan with water to cover and bring to a boil. Remove Hard Bread from heat and drain. Optional Add cooked flaked fish and mix if you would like what is called Fisherman’s Brewis. Keep hot. Fry pork until golden brown and crisp, serve with fish and brews.).

Drawn butter: melt butter in saucepan, add onions  and  fry until golden and soft. Do not brown. Sprinkle flour over mixture and mix thoroughly. Remove from heat. Stir in half water. Place on heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Beat until shiny and smooth. Slowly add remaining water, cook over low heat 2 to 3 minutes. Serve over fish and brewis.

My friends from Europe certainly enjoyed our traditional Newfoundland & Labrador cuisine.

Love Rural NL -

Christopher C. Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

Newfoundland Bakeapple Cheesecake Recipe

Bakeapple, the Cloudberry or the Chicouté is a delightful wild berry that grows on the marshes of the Great Northern Peninsula, Labrador and other parts of Northerly climates. Late July-early August is a great time to head to the barrens with your jugs and buckets to get some for yourself. The other option may be to purchase them at roadside.

I enjoy the berry in a pie, served with vanilla ice-cream but especially served as part of a Cheesecake. I’ve been using the following recipe for a while and decided to share it with you:

Crust
1/2 cup butter, melted
1 1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs
1/4 cup sugar

Filling
16 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
3 eggs, separated
1/2 cup sugar
2 tablespoons flour, all-purpose
1/2 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup blend cream (10%) or undiluted evaporated milk
2/3 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon lemon rind (zest)
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/4 cup sugar
2 cups bakeapple jam or sauce

Bakeapple Sauce
2 cups bakeapples
water
1 cup sugar
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/4 cup water

Crust
- Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease 9-inch spring-form pan.
– Melt butter, add crumbs and sugar; mix until mixture is moist and crumbly. Press against bottom and sides of greased springform pan. Bake 10-12 minutes at 350°F. Cool.

Filling
Reduce oven temperature to 325°F. Beat cream cheese well. Beat in egg yolks, then add l/2 cup sugar, Dour and salt. Beat well. Add cream, vanilla, lemon rind and juice; beat mixture until free from lumps.

In a clean bowl, beat egg whites until they reach the soft-peak stage. Beat in 1/4 cup sugar and continue beating until whites are stiff but not dry. Fold egg whites into cream cheese mixture.

Pour cream cheese mixture into baked crumb crust and bake at 325°F for 40-60 minutes or until it sets. The mixture will be a bit quivery when removed from the oven, but will set as it cools.

Cool cheesecake to room temperature, apply bakeapple sauce over the top, then refrigerate until serving (preferably 3-4 hours).

Bakeapple Sauce
Simmer bakeapples in a little water until tender, about 10 minutes. Add sugar and simmer another 5 minutes.

Mix cornstarch with enough water to form a paste. Stir into bakeapples and continue stirring until thickened and smooth.

Please visit http://newfoundland.ws for more superb recipes of Newfoundland & Labrador cuisine.

A visit to a restaurant in Newfoundland & Labrador, especially during summer will likely have this berry in a dessert, alcoholic beverage or as a garnish to a main course. Embrace the bakeapple along with so many residents of the Great Northern Peninsula – it truly is a treat that will tantalize the taste buds.

Live Rural NL -

Christopher C. Mitchelmore, MHA
The Straits-White Bay North

Newfoundland Seal Flipper Pie Recipe

While everyone awaits the development of a local seal flipper food stand., I will share with you all a Newfoundland Seal Flipper Pie Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 2 seal flippers
  • 1 small turnip
  • 3 carrots, sliced
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 1 parsnip, sliced
  • 2 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 ounce Newfoundland Screech
  • 1/2 lb fat back pork
  • 2 tbsp vinegar
  • salt & pepper to taste

Dumpling Pastry – Ingredients:

Directions:

  1.  Cut all fat and slag from flippers.
  2. Place them in a deep dish with enough boiling water to cover.
  3. Add vinegar and set aside to cool, then wipe dry with paper towel and place in baking pan or large casserole dish.
  4. Add pepper and salt to taste.
  5. Cover with sliced onions and sliced fat pork.
  6. Dribble Newfoundland Screech over contents.
  7. Cover and bake in pre-heated oven at 375 degrees F for 2 hours.
  8. Boil turnip, carrots and parsnip in 2 1/2 cups of water for about 20 minutes.
  9. When vegetables are ready, place in baking dish with flippers.
  10. Use vegetable water for gravy and thicken with flour.
  11. Make dumpling pastry and pat over flippers and vegetables.
  12. Cover and bake gently until pastry is done. This should take approximately 15 minutes.

Enjoy traditional seal flipper pie.

Live Rural NL -

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

Molasses Raisin Bread Recipe

Ingredients -

Dissolved yeast in 1 cup lukewarm water, to which the 2 tsp. sugar has already been added.

Ingredients -

  1.  Combine 3 cups of lukewarm water, molasses and melted butter.
  2. Sift dry ingredients together.
  3. Add raisins to dry ingredients.
  4. Stir dissolved yeast into molasses mixture.
  5. Stir flour mixture into molasses mixture and knead for 10-12 minutes.
  6. Place in a greased bowl and let rise until it doubles in size, which will take approximately 2 1/2 hours.
  7. Divide dough to form into loaves.
  8. Place in greased loaf pans and let rise for 1 hour.
  9. Bake at 350 degrees F for about 1 hour. Baking time may vary.
  10. When you take hot bread from oven, remove from pan, grease with butter and let cool.

Enjoy Your Molasses Raisin Bread!

Christopher C. Mitchelmore

Recipes From Grandma Pearl – Raisin Buns

I stand by the fact that my Grandmother Pearl is a wonderful baker. One of the enjoyable baked goods I love is a good raisin bun with a cup of tea. This makes for a quick breakfast or a nice snack at break time.

Ingredients

Directions -

Mix all dry ingredients together except custard powder. Add to milk. Add butter to dry ingredients and beat eggs. Add to dry mixture. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes. Yields approximately 2 1/2 dozen buns.

Molasses Buns & Tea`

Now you have the opportunity to make your own. If you would rather purchase this traditional foodstuff, you can stop by the Gros Morne Resort Gas Bar, St. Paul’s, NL. They sell a limited selection of baked bread, buns and rolls.  Six raisin buns sell for a low price of $2.99 or twelve for $5.00.

 
Enjoy!
 
Live Rural NL -
Christopher C. Mitchelmore
 
 

Apple, Walnut and Blue Cheese Salad with Lingonberry Vinaigrette

The Lingonberry in Rural Newfoundland & Labrador is referred to locally as the “Partridgeberry”.

After reviewing From Our Atlantic Woods -Non-Timber Forest Product Directory 2009-2010, a recipe supplied by Pure Labrador seemed like a delicious use of for local berries.

Apple, Walnut and Blue Cheese Salad with Lingonberry Vinaigrette (Serves 4)

Ingredients (Vinaigrette)

Directions -

Mix all together and shake well

Ingredients (Salad)

  • Mixed baby salad greens
  • 1 apple
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) crumbled blue cheese

Directions -

  1. Spread a bed of salad greens on 4 plates
  2. Core and quarter the apple
  3. Thinly slice each quarter into 6-8 slices and place on the greens in an attractive fan
  4. Sprinkle 1 tbsp (15 ml) each walnuts and blue cheese over the apple and greens
  5. Drizzle the Lingonberry Vinaigrette over the salads.

 I am looking forward to trying this salad, which will have local wild berries. Be creative with locally grown products and start your own FOOD REVOLUTION!

Rabbit Soup on Saturday

 

Wild Rabbit Soup

The utilities company noted they would be doing some upgrades to the main power line, leaving local residents from Castor River to Eddies Cove without electricity until 11:00 AM. This delayed my traditional lunch at grandma’s house.
 
 Early in the morning, I lit a fire. The heat from locally cut wood, provided much warmth. I did some chores and brought out some light trash. I dropped in to visit my grandmother, who faithfully had the pot on the stove and noted she was cooking “Rabbit Soup”, but it would not be ready until about 1:30 PM. We chatted for a bit  and she had also proudly showed me all her knitting. She certainly keeps quite busy.

Rabbit

The table was prepared, with homemade bread, the salt & pepper shakers, the rabbit had been taken from the pot and soup ready to be poured into each bowl. The rabbit was delicious. My grandmother and I always have a good chat, whether it is about the hockey game, curling, gardening, weather or past times. I had told her I was looking at old photos earlier, some of which included my grandfather, father and of  course my childhood.RabbitMany good memories.
 
I enjoy traditional recipes of rural Newfoundland. My grandmother and I discussed how traditions are dying as far fewer people of the younger generations are cooking with wild game. Modernization and the convenience of pre-packaged food is having an impact on the dishes that have been served on Newfoundland tables for centuries.
 

 

RECIPE FOR NEWFOUNDLAND RABBIT SOUP
 
 1 lb. Salt beef
2 qts of cold water
1 Wild game rabbit (cleaned and cut up)
3 carrots
1 lb turnip
4 med. Potatoes
1 med. Onion
few drips of gravy browning
3 ½ – 4 qts. Cold water
 
Cut salt beef into small pieces. Place in large saucepan and add 2 qts. cold water. Bring to a boil. Place salt beef, rabbit and remaining 3 ½ qts (cook 1 ½ hours). Add vegetables  and browning. Cook 30 minutes.
 
Bon Apetit!
 
Live Rural NL 0
Christopher Mitchelmore
 
 

Fisherman’s Brewis for Sunday Dinner

Cod fish soaking

The fish has been soaking the night prior. Whenever a Newfoundlander says “fish” he is referring to cod fish. If he is talking about other types of fish, he will call it by name.

Today for dinner, I was able to enjoy a great meal of Fisherman’s Brewis.

Brewis, Fish, Potatoes and Fried Pork and Onions

The recipe is simple, yet big on delivery. You need hard tack (Famous Purity Hard Bread). This should be soaked in cold water until soft. We used three cakes for our meal. We had some already filleted cod, so we did not need to be as worried about the bones. One must fry fat port until a little brown.

Preparing Fisherman’s Brewis

Cook fish, add the hard bread and mash it all together and served. This meal can be cooked within a short 20 minutes.

 
We had a side of boiled potatoes, homemade pickles and buttered or Crosbie Molasses “Lassie” bread. 
 
Fisherman’s Brewis Spread

This is a treat to the standard brewis on Sunday, when hot dinner is not being served.

 
The conversation was around how we should have this heritage meal more often.
 
After the meal, I steeped a cup of Screech tea made locally by The Dark Tickle Company, St. Lunaire-Griquet on the Great Northern Peninsula.
Screech Tea from Dark Tickle Company

There is truly something great about Living Rural and enjoying traditional recipes that have been mainstays of Rural Life for centuries.

 
Live Rural NL 0
Christopher Mitchelmore

NL Moose Soup on Saturday

Saturday in Rural Newfoundland, has long been known as Soup Saturday. In September 2009, I returned to my community on the island of Newfoundland. Since that time, I continue my previous tradition of visiting my grandmother who makes soup every Saturday to enjoy a drop.

Moose Soup from Grandma's Kitchen

She makes traditional split pea soup, turkey neck, rabbit, partridge and my favourite – Moose Soup.

I love the flavour of the all the garden vegetables mixed with salt meat (beef) and of course the moose. I also love the fact that she adds macaroni noodles. Those who know me well, know I enjoy macaroni in my soup. In fact, my Aunt Viola always added extra to her soup when she knew I was coming over.

Moose Meat from the Soup

When I enter my grandmother’s kitchen on Saturday, she had the moose meat placed on the table, salt & pepper shakers are always in the same location, homemade bread is sliced and strawberry flavoured drink mix readily available.  One has to dig in and can not simply stop at one bowl.

Freshly Sliced Homemade Bread

Soup is a great dinnertime meal (we do not call it lunch in Rural Newfoundland), especially when it is complimented by some of grandma’s freshly baked bread.

 
Over the cooling of the soup, we usually share memories of the past, talk about my grandfather, family and days from my grandmother’s childhood.
 
Tetley Tea & Biscuits

We continue the conversation over a cup of Tetley Tea after our meal and marshmallow biscuits that I’ve enjoyed at grandma’s ever since I can remember.

 
I just called asking for the recipe, which all spoken like a true Newfoundland cook, not with exact measurements.
 
She uses moose meat, with some bone (if possible), a handful of salt beef in a 4 qrt. pot adding water and letting simmer for a couple of hours. She dices carrot, turnip and potatoes (about 3 or 4 handfuls) and adds to the pot for about 45 minutes. A chopped onion is added. She adds 1/4 cup of rice and macaroni for about 20 minutes. She adds a can of tomato soup and beef oxo cup for additional flavour. Grandma’s secret recipe is out! I’ll still prefer her pot to mine any day.
 
This is one tradition, I am happy to continue as I live in Rural Newfoundland and will cherish always.
 
Live Rural NL 0
Christopher Mitchelmore

Fish Chowder with Hard Bread

  • 1 small cod-fish
  • 3 or 4 potatoes
  • salt pork, diced
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 2 cakes of hard bread
  • 2 cups of milk
  • 4 cups of water
  • 1/2 tsp mixed herbs
  • salt & pepper

Wash and dry fish and cut into small pieces. Place the fish, potatoes and pork in stewing pan in alternate layers, sprinkling each layer with onion, herbs, salt and pepper. Add the water, cover closely and cook for about 40 minutes. Then add the hard bread which has been soaking in water for about 3 or 4 hours, or until soft. Strain off water, add warm milk. Cook 10 minutes after adding hard bread. Serve with a fresh roll.

A Moose Recipe for Slow Cookers – Crock Pot Moose Soup

Ingredients

  • 3 cups chopped, cooked moose
  • 3 stalks of celery chopped
  • 3 carrots, sliced
  • 2 small onions, chopped
  • 1  16 oz can of tomatoes
  • 1 package of frozen mixed vegetables
  • 1 package of chili seasoning mix
  • 1-1/2 qts beef stock
  • 1/3 cup margarine
  • 1/2 cup flour

Combine all ingredients except the margarine and flour. Cover and cook on low for 8-10 hours. One hour before serving turn the crock pot on high. Blend margarine and flour until smooth and add slowly to he soup. Continue to cook and stir until soup becomes thicker. Serve with bread.

Enjoy!

Live Rural NL – CCM

Patridgeberry Pie Recipe

It is that time of year to enjoy a freshly made patridgeberry pie.

  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 cup margarine
  • 1/3 cup milk
  • 1 tsp. vinegar, added to milk
  • 1 1/2- 2 cups patridgeberry berries
  • sugar and butter

Pastry:

Mix flour and margarine with pastry blender until it resembles crumbs, add the milk mixture, a little at a time, stirring with a fork or knife.

Roll out on slightly floured board and cut to fit pie plate. Put in amount of berries required and sprinkle with sugar to taste. Add a few pieces of margarine. Cover wwith strips or full-size layer of pastry. Bake at hot oven. Makes 2 small double pies or one large one.

Got to Get Me Moose by’

Moose

September 11, 2010  marks the start of moose hunting season for most areas across the province of Newfoundland & Labrador. It is a time of year that is highly anticipated by many local residents and visitors from out of province to partake in such an important traditional and cultural activity. 

“The traditions and culture associated with hunting and trapping are quite significant in our province, and I encourage everyone to take advantage of the many wonderful opportunities that exist,” said Minister Johnson. “As a public resource, wildlife must be managed so that it benefits the diverse interests of all stakeholders, while ensuring that populations of animals and their habitats can be sustained for future generations” (Click for more info on the 2010-11 Hunting and Trapping Guide and Big Game Licence Applications). 

Hunting presents an economic boom for outfitting lodges and many small local businesses for supplies, transportation needs, accommodations and meat processors. We must use extreme caution on our highways and watch out for our brightly orange dressed companions in the wilderness as we spend time with our buddies in search of delicious moose meat. At the bottom, I’ve included a Moose Stew Recipe. 

The activity has been popularized through song written and performed by Kevin Blackmore and Ray Johnson of Buddy Wasisname and the Other Fellers. Lyrics below: 

Like to go a-moose hunting, hunting in the fall,
Like to go a-moose hunting, answer the hunting call:
“Gotta get me moose, b’y!”
 

Well first to get a moose licence you apply for six whole years,
At thirty-five dollars a crack, old man, with a partner for half shares;
And when you get the licence, “cock” ’tis area twenty-eight,
Nowhere near civ-il-i-zation, three hundred miles away.
But I gotta get me moose, b’y!! 

Like to go a-moose hunting, hunting in the fall,
Like to go a-moose hunting, answer the hunting call:
“Gotta get me moose, b’y!”
 

To get ya where you’re going it’s a Hilton on four wheels,
Gets easily stuck, and the gas tank leaks and something up front squeals;
We met four fellas on a trip and we got on the beer,
They were on their way to our back yards and we was off to theirs.
Gotta get me moose b’y!! 

Like to go a-moose hunting, hunting in the fall,
Like to go a-moose hunting, answer the hunting call:
“Gotta get me moose, b’y!”
 

Trottin’ on the bogs for miles with a pack sack on your back,
And you know he’s always just ahead, the fresh buttons in his tracks;
Well maybe he can hear us, b’ys, or maybe it’s his snout…
I allow it’s not hard to get a whiff of we after five or six days out!
Hah! Gotta get me moose, b’y!! 

Like to go a-moose hunting, hunting in the fall,
Like to go a-moose hunting, answer the hunting call:
“Gotta get me moose, b’y!”
 

At last we saw a great big bull and oh my, what a fuss!
Fired ten shots and had to run! He started chasing us. Hah!
But when we got him killed, me lads, I had to panch his gut!
Me manly hunting instinct left and me supper all heaved up.
Whoop! Gotta get me moose b’y!! 

Like to go a-moose hunting, hunting in the fall,
Like to go a-moose hunting, answer the hunting call:
“Gotta get me moose, b’y!”
 

Jack, we got to lug ‘im out, you were fine to have along,
But my next partner will be a wrestler, twice as big and strong;
And never again will I go out across the bog so far,
I’ll wait till I sees one on the road and I’ll wing ‘im with me car!!
Hah! That’s how I’ll get me moose, b’y!! 

Like to go a-moose hunting, hunting in the fall,
Like to go a-moose hunting, answer the hunting call:
“Gotta get me moose, b’y!”
 

I highly recommend if you are coming from a way and want a superior hunting and guiding experience, you will want to stay at the Tuckamore Lodge at Main Brook, NL. Check it out for yourself http://www.tuckamorelodge.com/ 

Moose Stew

MOOSE STEW 

  • 3 lbs moose, cut into small pieces
  • 1/4 lb butter
  • salt and pepper

Brow moose meat in hot butter. Add water, salt and pepper. Let simmer, adding chopped onion after about an hour of cooking. Cook for another hour. 

Then chop and add: 

  • 2 carrots
  • 1 small turnip
  • 5-10 potatoes

Cook for 30 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Make dumplings if you wish. 

Public safety is off the utmost importance. Although the government has increased moose hunting licences and noted they have purchased groomers and will be grooming parts of the province, are they doing enough? There have already been a number of moose vehicle collisions this year, as with any year. How many more do we need to have before the government steps up to the plate and follows other provinces, like New Brunswick and implements appropriate animal fencing?  

Safe and happy hunting in rural NL – CCM 

  

 

Fill Your Puddick: Fish Recipes from Grandmother’s Kitchen

Hello again!

Today I’m sharing with you some local fish recipes that we still add to our palate. Since the recreation cod fishery is ongoing you might be able to enjoy some fresh fish if you come to our provincial paradise. Just a piece of insider information, for readers unaware, in Newfoundland & Labrador we say fish, we mean “cod” and if we talk about other fish species we name them specifically such as Salmon, Trout, Herring. Certainly, the cod fishery has been the mainstay of Rural Newfoundland & Labrador well before the days of Giovanni Caboto some 500+ years ago.

Puddick – (defined in the Newfoundland Dictionary as Stomach).

RECIPE #1: Fried Cod Tongues

Fried Cod Tongues

  • 1 lb cod cheeks
  • 1 1/2 cups of flour
  • 1 egg
  • Salt & Pepper

Wash cod cheeks. Beat egg. Coat cheeks in beaten egg. Put cheeks in a bag with a mixture of flour, pinch of salt and pepper. Shake until cheeks are well floured. Fry in a pan until golden brown.

A simple but delicious recipe! When the opportunity arises, drop by a get yourself some cod tongues.

RECIPE #2: Fish Cakes

  • 2 lbs salt cod fish (boiled)
  • 8 medium potatoes (mashed)

    Golden Brown Fish Cakes

  • 1 medium onion (diced)
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1/4 savoury
  • small piece of salt pork
  • Pepper

Cut salt pork into small pieces and fry until brown in frying pan. Remove pork cubes, leaving fat in pan to fry fish cakes. Mix fish, potatoes, onion and savoury together. Shape into round cakes and coat with flour. Add a dash of pepper. Fry both sides until golden brown.

My grandfather would take great pride with drying fish and then placing it in brine. I’ve always enjoyed salt fish. This technique of drying and salting forms a lovingly delicious appetizer or meal that can be found in almost any local restaurant. If you are ever in the neighbourhood, drop by for a “scoff”.

RECIPE #3: Baked Cod Fish

  • Choose a firm codfish. Remove head, tail and sound bone. Wash and clean skin with a sharp knife. Wipe dry.
  • Salt pork (optional) 

Dressing:

  • 3 cups soft bread crumbs
  • 1 tbsp savoury
  • 1/8 tsp pepper
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 3 tbsp butter
  • 1/4 small onion (finely minced)

Mix dressing ingredients together and stuff the fish. Tie securely to a skewer. Place dressed fish in a roasting pan in which salt pork has been fried. Bake for 10 minutes at 450 degrees F. Reduce heat to 400 degrees F and bake for one hour. Baste occasionally and add sliced  onion to roasting pan for flavour during final 20 minutes of baking.

I will share with you other recipes from the Rural Newfoundland kitchen in the coming days.

Cooking up a storm -

CCM

Sunday Dinner

Today, I had dinner with my grandmother, an intelligent youthful person at the mere age of 78. She certainly can put up a good meal. We chatted, as we ate fried vegetables (greens, potatoes, salt meat, onion and oil) and other remnants of yesterday’s Sunday dinner. It was very special as we had an opportunity to reflect on her first summers of coming to the community which has become her home for 6 decades. She makes the very best puddings and I always tell her. Today, I inquired further as to how and when she learned. As the oldest child, she learned from her mother at a very young age and passed on these skills to her younger siblings. In her words, “everyone had to contribute”. Everyone learned a variety of talents that prepared them as they progressed to take on the world. It seems we are losing some very valuable customs and traditions as not everyone chooses to learn.

I will share with you how to prepare Sunday’s Dinner, since it is my favorite traditional Newfoundland meal. It is chicken or turkey with stuffing, potatoes, carrots, turnips, greens, cabbage, potatoes, gravy, peas pudding and our famous salt beef. We also have a selection of other puddings that may be served with the meal: bread pudding, raisin pudding (locally referred to as “figgy duff”), molasses pudding, blackberry, partridge berry and there are many others! My grandmother makes the best raisin puddings and molasses puddings. Yum!

SUNDAY DINNER

  • 1 Whole Chicken, Turkey, Moose Roast or other meat product
  • 1 cup yellow split peas
  • 6-8 medium potatoes
  • 6 carrots
  • 1 medium turnip (peel and slice)
  • 1 medium cabbage (cut in wedges)       
  • Slices of slightly stale bread
  • Onion
  • Ground Pepper
  • Salt
  • Spices (thyme, basil or rosemary)
  • Butter
  1. Prepare stuffing by soaking slightly stale bread in water. Squeeze to remove excess water. Add melted butter, salt, black pepper and seasoning (basil, rosemary or thyme).
  2. Prepare chicken or meat, lightly salt. Place stuffing inside chicken, excess can be wrapped in foil. In a roasting pan, place chicken and add water. Cook on 350 F, lightly baste and add an onion for flavour. 
  3. Soak salt meat overnight, drain and place in large cooking pot. Tie peas in cloth bag (locally referred to as “peas pudding bag”); however, a mason jar with a few holes punched at the top will also be sufficient. Put peas in pot with salt beef. Cover beef and peas with water. Heat to boiling, cover and simmer for 2 hours.
  4. Prepare vegetables. Small carrots and potatoes may be left whole, larger ones are to be cut in half. Slice turnip and cut cabbage into wedges. After meat and peas have cooked for 2-2.5 hours add vegetables and cook until tender, adding the cabbage last.
  5. Remove peas from bag, place in bowl and mash with butter and black pepper to make peas pudding.
  6. Remove salt meat and slice. Remove vegetables and place on platter and serve.

FIGGIE DUFF

  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 2 cups of flour
  • 1 egg
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 cup milk or water
  • 1 cup of raisins
  • Pinch of salt

Combine dry ingredients, add milk and egg. Put in a cloth or spring container and boil for two hours.

MOLASSES PUDDING

  • 1 cup of molasses
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp allspice
  • 1/2 cup hot water
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 3 cups flour

Mix together molasses, sugar and spices in a bowl. Dissolve baking soda in hot water. Add to first mixture, then add melted butter and raisins. Mix well. Add sifted flour a little at a time. Put in greased pudding mould and steam 1 1/2 to 2 hours.

Hope you enjoy! I certainly did this past Sunday with my grandma, mom, her partner and my three aunts. Many great talks or yarns happen around the kitchen table in rural Newfoundland, both in the past and still today.

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