A Historic Rein….Town of Flower’s Cove Sends Open Invitation

September 9th marks a monumental moment in our history as Queen Elizabeth II’s reign will surpass that of Canada’s other great Mother of Confederation, Queen Victoria. Tomorrow, our Monarch will have served us and the Commonwealth for the longest period in our modern history and the Town of Flower’s Cove has partnered to organize a special event at Canon Richard’s Memorial Academy.


The Monarchist League of Canada has encouraged all Municipalities to recognize this milestone 63 years and 217 days in the making. None of us needs to be reminded of how remarkable a woman is Elizabeth II. Monarchists or republicans, Canadians agree that our Sovereign has shown the ideals to which we might all aspire and which reflect our country’s traditions and the best of its contemporary way of life: inclusiveness, stability, friendship, service, dignity, defiance of stereotypes of age and gender, to name but a few.

Join us at Canon Richard’s Memorial Academy parking lot tomorrow, September  9th at noon for a brief lunchtime event that will last between 15-20 minutes commemorating this historic occasions with the singing of the National Anthem, Proclamation, Oath of Allegiance and a Tribute to the Queen. Should the weather be less than ideal, the event will be held at the gymnasium.

I look forward to the commemoration and hope to see you there.

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-White Bay North)

What’s in a Name?….Nameless Cove, NL


I think it was Shakespeare’s Juliet in a soliloquy, who asked “What’s in a Name?” We’ll let me tell you…

As you leave the paved highway in Nameless Cove and trek onto a gravel route at Nameless Cove point you will be able to have a closer view of Flower’s Island and its beautiful lighthouse. The first lightkeeper was Peter Flower, thus naming the island and became the name of the adjacent community, Flower’s Cove (now Nameless Cove). Here is the background story on how Nameless Cove, came to be: the Municipality of Flower’s Cove was formerly French Island Harbour. After the treaty and the French presence left, the larger community opted to use the name Flower’s Cove, thus, leaving the former Flower’s Cove – Nameless.


Nameless Cove is where I operated Flower’s Island Museum from 2002-2005, which included a nine-hole Newfoundland themed miniature golf-course. There were development plans for the island at the time that would see maybe a tea room, accommodations and a boat tour. Sadly, this never transpired and made it more difficult to establish the critical volume of tourist needed to advance regional tourism in the Straits. In the past ten years since, much effort has been placed on walking trails and further developing Deep Cove. However, the Straits is just scratching the surface on how it could benefit from tourism, given the number that pass through these communities each season to see St. Anthony and the World UNESCO site at L’anse aux Meadows.


Since Peter Flowers, generations and generations of Lavallee’s would operate that lighthouse until it became automated. The Lavallee’s are still present today and some continue to fish these adjacent waters. The late Clyde Roberts, was the radio operator on the island. He spent some of his earlier years on this island and continued to pursue community economic development in the region – pressing for co-ops, credit unions and a non-profit personal care home and affordable housing units. In my books he is a local icon, a visionary, that made big things happen!

The presence of the fishery is ever so important today as it was our reason for settling. People continue to earn a living from the sea. This is evident from the small fishing stages, wharves, lobster traps and gear hugging the shoreline.

From old family homesteads to today’s residents, Nameless Cove is a community that is hanging onto its past and looking toward the future. I believe there is opportunity and more can be done to advance both fishing and tourism synergies, Drop by and find out more about What’s in a Name?

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-White Bay North)

Romanians go all out for Easter in Bucharest


After leaving Istanbul, Turkey, I spent a couple of days in Bucharest, Romania over the Orthodox Easter. This city of just under two million residents has been coined as Little Paris in the era between the two World Wars for its elegant architecture and sophistication of its elite society.

Despite most of the shops being closed for the holiday, I had the most amazing time at the Intercontinental, which two nights cost me $130.00 CDN with an amazing view from the balcony. I was greeted with a surprise welcome package of a bottle of reserve pinot noir wine and a special cake in which a feast is had for the holiday. A truly welcoming and friendly staff showing their dedication, care and willingness to share local knowledge.


After breakfast I would embark on what would be the first of a three hour walking tour. It was amazing to see such an interest in Easter and it’s celebration throughout this picturesque city from the parks to the waterways to the architecture.


The Communist-era’s People’s Palace, which houses the Parliament today is the world’s largest building with an administrative function. It really is that big and you certainly have to stop many times in awe at its sheer size. The walk through the first park presented many Easter bunnies, eggs, decor and an outdoor market. It truly was fun to see how other countries go all out to celebrate the holiday.

I did two other three hour walking tours as well that day. My last three hour walking tour, I did take the subway to reduce the time spent walking by just over 1 hour. I enjoyed viewing the variety of homes in the open air museum, walking another park, seeing the museums, facades, monuments, parks, churches and viewing areas. There were ample activities to enjoy recreation, such as the mini-golf and a spider challenge obstacle rope course, similar to something you can experience at Marble Mountain just outside of Corner Brook.


From fast cars, to coffee rest stops to book vending machines, it seemed like this savvy city had so much to offer. My time was not long enough in this magical place. I worked for two days trying to spend $70, it really is that affordable. I enjoyed an amazing traditional meal of lamb and rice, with a side of creamy potatoes, some red wine, espressos and this lovely pastry filled with powdered cream for dessert. I was surrounded by a band singing in the local language and people in the restaurant dancing. Truly I felt these couple of nights were well worth the trip.

I would get up and travel to Brussels in the morning, where I would visit for the second time. I made sure to tour the Parliament of the European Union and head to Luxembourg where the EU Highest Court of Justice is located. I’ll save this for another post, which rounds off my Easter travels.

If you haven’t been and want a high-value vacation without the high price tag, I truly recommend going to Romania – it really is a little Paradise!

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-White Bay North)

Tantalizing Traditions Served at Burnt Cape Cafe – Raleigh, NL


The Burnt Cape Cafe is a wonderful place to dine on traditional seafood dishes, moose meals and berry desserts. Situated in historic Raleigh this business offers an appealing space, with beautiful waterfront views, while listening to the music by local Quirpon native Wayne Bartlett.


This season moose has made the menu, including soup, burgers and cheese steak sandwiches. I ordered the moose soup to start and it surely was a welcome treat, as I’ve not had my grandmother’s version in such a long time. It was a hearty bowl, with chunky vegetables and filled with savouring flavour. A great way to start any meal.


As a main, I had pan fried cod, steamed broccoli. and Parmesan mashed potatoes with coleslaw. The meal was cooked with care, as the vegetables were perfect, the potatoes are out of this world dreamy and the cod just incredibly fresh as it fell gently with each fork full.


No meal could be complete without dessert, so I opted for the bakeapple sundae. This was truly a tantalizing treat! Local wildberries add to the gourmet flavouring of what the dining experience at Burnt Cape Cafe offers to its patrons.


The business, which includes cabins, vacation home, convenience store, gift shop and gas station has a rating of 9.1 from Booking.com which highlights the care and attention to visitors. The owners have put together a nice package to offer an experience to their guests. This may include the walk to the wharf to pick your own lobster for dinner and getting your photo taken for social media to capture the moment.

A Little Free Library has popped up outside their business, where residents and visitors can take a book or leave a book any time of the day. This is a great community economic development concept and initiative that I’d love to see more Little Free Libraries on the Great Northern Peninsula and across Newfoundland & Labrador.


I enjoy conversations with Ted and Marina, the owners of this small business as they are striving to find new ways to create opportunities in their small Town.


Keep up your entrepreneurial spirit Ted and Marina! Rural Newfoundland and Labrador certainly needs more small business to thrive!

It’s not too late to make a booking or drop by this gem on the tip of the Great Northern Peninsula. Visit www.burntcape.com/

Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-White Bay North)

My Turkish Times – The Real Turkish Delight

During the Easter Holidays, I added Turkey to my travels to experience the real Turkish delight! After a few unforgettable days in the Georgian mountain town of Kazbegi, it would be Istanbul before making the trek to Romania.


Istanbul with a population of more than 14 million, is a crowded city of Turkey that is located between Europe and Asia across the Bosphorus Strait. There are many unique architectural pieces and cultural influences that highlight the history of the Sultans, the Roman-era, Egyptian influences and also Christian mosaics.

One of the highlights was shopping at the Grand Bazaar, which is one of the largest and oldest covered markets in the world, which spans 61 streets and over 3,000 shops. I purchased some Jasmine and natural teas, items for my shisha and an ornament for my International Christmas tree. It was also nice to stop for Turkish tea and a traditional sandwich. During the afternoon or mid-day while I was there, most patrons closed up shop for one of their daily prayers. If my sister was with me on vacation, I’m sure she would still be there perusing all the shops and their wares.


I spent the day touring the major attractions, such as Sultan Ahmet’s (Blue) Mosque, Aya Sophia, Topkapi Palace, Hippodrome, Istanbul Archaeology Museum and other surrounding sites.


The Aya Sopha was the emperor’s statement to the world of the wealth and technical ability of his empire. Tradition maintained that the area surrounding the emperor’s throne within the church was the official centre of the world. The Aya Sofya has remained one of Istanbul’s most cherished landmarks.

Topkapi Palace has many highlights including the Harem, Palace Kitchens, Council Chambers, Sultan’s private rooms, safekeeping room and treasury. You’ll need at least a half-day just for this one spectacular site.

The Istanbul Archaeological Museum is just a short distance from the Palace. It has multiple complexes including the Museum of the Ancient Orient; the Archaeology Museum and the ceramic collection at the Tiled Pavilion of Mehmet the Conqueror.


The Blue Mosque was Sultan Ahmet I’s grand architectural gift to his capital, built between 1609-1616.

I spent time walking the streets, enjoying the blue skies, flowers and vibes of Istanbul. There were many enjoyable moments of consuming culture, including the food and dining with the locals. It was truly a unique experience.


My time in Turkey was short, but I was ambitious and covered much ground. Even the return to the airport was hurried as the taxi driver by-passed all traffic by primarily driving on the shoulder of the road. Despite all the efforts of locals, I did not return with a rug. I did buy lots of Turkish delights and brought back memories that will last a lifetime. I highly recommend Turkey to your travel list.

One of my favourite purchases was this t-shirt “Experience: On the Road Again – 1985”. Given my birth year being 1985, my love for travel and the experiences my time of the road has given me, it was only fitting! I’ll wear it proudly.


Live Rural NL –

Christopher Mitchelmore, MHA (The Straits-White Bay North)


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